Political Factors Of The Soviet Union In The Cold War

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The Soviet Union was one of the most powerful communist countries in the world due to its invincible army. During the Stalin’s era, Moscow was the center of an international communist movement. Most of the communist nations during the Cold War were the Soviet satellite states such as Poland, Hungary, Czechoslovakia, and Bulgaria, along with China. From the Soviet’s perspective, the foreign communist parties could be used in diplomatic games with the Western powers and as necessary parts of the Soviet project to create one big international communist system. During the Khrushchev, Brezhnev, and Gorbachev eras, ideological factors were the main contributor to the Soviet’s foreign policy with other communist countries and the West. The combinations …show more content…
Khrushchev was the catalyst of political and social change. Both of his domestic and foreign policies bring out improvements; however, they were not enough to fix the fundamental problems. His ambitions and attempts to de-Stalinize the Soviet’s society became the primary engine behind changes in foreign policies. Khrushchev’s de-Stalinization campaign caused widespread repercussions throughout the communist world. The purpose of de-Stalinization was to weaken his enemies in the Communist Party and to strengthen and solidify his position as a leader. Khrushchev wanted to end Stalin’s anti-Tito campaign. He believed that “a rapprochement with Yugoslavia would bring this country back into the Soviet sphere and enhance Moscow’s geopolitical positions in Southern Europe and the Balkans” (Zubok, 99). In addition, he also acknowledged that it was important for the Soviet Union to strengthen its alliance with PRC. As long as the PRC continues to support the Soviet’s interpretation of Marxism-Leninism, the Soviet would provide the technology and the complete know-how for the construction of atomic weapons. Like others Soviet leaders, Khrushchev policies were stemmed from the interest of preventing the rise of reform movements as well as restoring the orthodox Communist rule, which was defined by the Soviet’s version of …show more content…
The Brezhnev Doctrine was a big part of Brezhnev’s policy and diplomacy with other nations and leaders. The invasion of Czechoslovakia in 1968 “substantiated the fears of the Soviet anti-Stalinist intelligentsia that the post-Khrushchev leadership might take the country in a neo-Stalinist direction” (Zubok, 190). In a way, this invasion illustrates Brezhnev’s intention of protecting and restoring the orthodox Communist rule throughout the Soviet Bloc. Brezhnev regarded the far-reaching liberalization in Czechoslovakia as a fundamental threat to the cohesion of the Warsaw Pact. He was concerned because the development in Czechoslovakia could encourage other satellite states to follow, which would lead to a widespread rebellion against the Soviet’s leadership. Moreover, the rise of the anti-communist national movement, Solidarity, in Poland also posed complications to the integrity of the bloc. Although, the Soviet Union did not intervene directly, the Soviet officials had devised plans for full-scale invasion if the Polish Communist Party fails to prevent the disruption of the bloc. The fact that such plans and dilemma existed, show that the Soviet Union was willing to use extreme measures to prevent deviation from

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