Political-Economic Paradigm Analysis

Great Essays
Political-economic paradigms are useful in analysis of a contemporary media arrangement and the role of media in political practices, both in a New Zealand context. In doing this some key issues are illuminated; the state of democratic process in New Zealand and how it is compromised or facilitated, the role of technology in politics, social values that are perpetuated through mainstream media, the significance of advertising and ultimately the relevance of understanding a variety of differing political economic paradigms. This essay is organised into three key parts. The first describes key aspects of liberal-pluralism and Marxism, that are relevant. The second applies these paradigms to New Zealand 's mainstream print media after digital …show more content…
Each paradigm’s perspective on advertising varies significantly. Marxism is particularly bitter and therefore understandable cynical about the current digital news media landscape in New Zealand. Whereas Liberal-pluralism sees it as a positive generator of supply and demand. Furthermore, liberal pluralism sees power as far more evenly distributed; Marxism highlights the inequalities of the class-system inherent in capitalist society. Liberal-pluralism has a tendency to focus on citizen as consumer, as this, as the paradigm suggests is where power really lies. Consumers can select and reject certain content or products thereby facilitating supply and demand/the invisible hand and controlling what is produced through this power. Marxism more strongly suggest a kind of naivety of the proletariat and their lack of agency under bourgeois rule. Regarding media more broadly, liberal-pluralism suggests media are independent and unaffected by external forces and do their utmost to depict fair, balanced content. Marxism suggest that media produced socially manufactured messages, that uphold and can not escape the biases of the bourgeoisie in capitalist systems.While liberal-pluralism challenges many Marxist ideas, both are focused on understanding capitalist societies. Therefore it is useful to use them both for nuanced analysis because of their contrasting

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    This alienation is evident in Marx’s commodity fetishism as well as Lukács reification. Further, they argue that this alienation is a major problem of capitalism that needs to be addresses. Both reification and commodity fetishism alienate the worker and establish human beings as objects. The development of class consciousness is how the worker is able to overcome this…

    • 757 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Private property is the defining characteristic of capitalism. Marxism and Liberalism are significantly different political ideologies. For this reason, it is a surprising to discover, when comparing and contrasting these philosophies, Marx and Mill are able to agree on certain facets of private property. Both philosophies believe that private ownership of production and property creates an unstable but expanding economy. Simply put, they agree that private property creates a class who achieves concentrated wealth, and a working class that is burden with struggles.…

    • 928 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    The Occupy Wall Street movement can be analyzed through the lens of Karl Marx and David Harvey. Harvey critiques the idea of self-regulating markets, or neoliberalism, because not everyone has an equal opportunity in the market and without any state intervention it becomes unfair to those stuck at the bottom. Marx writes about the class struggles between the proletariat and the bourgeois. The bourgeois have purchased the labor of the proletariat at a minimal price and therefore have alienated the proletariat from their own work, but they have also given the proletariat the knowledge of how to work the means of production, so Marx predicted a social revolution would happen where the proletariat will gain power. Well, that did not happen, but…

    • 2077 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    A heavy reliance on funding from advertisers means that media content is geared toward views not public interest. Marxist theories are useful in analysing contemporary cultures, through highlighting inequalities of capitalist systems (Ibid, 69). Albeit, it takes a negative standpoint. Week 4 - New Thoughts on the Public Sphere in Aotearoa New Zealand. Wayne Hope, 2012.…

    • 1038 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    This main contrast sets a myriad of opposite postures that have a socio-economic and political impact. For example, the capitalist system base individual prosperity on free market with a small government and the opposite, considers government controlled industries as a mean to social prosperity. While in capitalism companies are owned by the private sector; in socialism the government owns the companies. Individual freedom to property, competition and assets management contrasted by elimination of private property and government welfare programs that provide same social benefits. Capitalism can cause huge distance between the classes which can result in social uneasiness, while Socialism systems attempts to assure social equality.…

    • 1058 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    And in most of the advanced capitalist societies, the meaning freedom is what neoliberalism gave it nowadays. The reconstruction of the freedom in a neoliberal sense not only promotes capitalism but undermines collectivism, solidarity, and reciprocity and thus may cause further social crises that would be irrevocable because of people’s underestimation of collective…

    • 1322 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    He argued that production forces people to exchange good and services, not individuals. Economic relations are beyond the individual in the sense that they grow and change separate to the interconnections of individuals, And these relationships have power over the individual. Individuals aren’t independents, they just appear so when separated from society. But, as Marx states, they can’t be separated from society because in capitalism, social classes shaped the individual and how they interacted with production and each other. Much like liberal democracy, Marx believed that individual rights were harmful to the proletariat because they favored the landowning bourgeoisie over the proletariat.…

    • 1095 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Marx And Engels Analysis

    • 1310 Words
    • 5 Pages

    This excerpt from Marx and Engels’ Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts centres around the concept of the inherent estrangement between the producer and the product. This dichotomy of opposites is frequently reinforced in the text, through the idea of what the two parts of society, (in simple terms, the rich and the poor), receive in reward for the work of the worker. The language of “wonderful” and “privation,” “palaces” and “hovels”, “beauty” and “deformity,” makes clear, through the use of clearly opposing language, the central anti-capitalist message in this particular extract. It also serves to encourage a re-humanisation of the labourer, where a capitalist structure encourages the opposite: the commodification of human beings, and the…

    • 1310 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The individualistic ideas and ideology conveyed through mass-produced media place negative feelings in consumers that cause the artificial need to consume for instant gratification (Dunn 2008:35). These imposed tendencies to consume will be referred to as “false needs”, which are not essential to survival and serve only to create the illusion that consumption is cathartic (Ibid). This brings about the prominent notion of the “totally administered society”, as introduced by the Frankfurt school (Ibid:33). This concept posits the passivity of consumers and examines how demand is imposed on individuals through cultural media that stimulates the desire to consume (Ibid). A notable example of consumer passivity and “totally administered society” is the change in social trends from telephone to radio (Adorno and Horkheimer 1947:31).…

    • 1632 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Both Marx and Weber have contributed an important insight into the understanding of society and classical sociology. Their work can be compared similarly, with both theorists recognizing the exploitative nature of capitalism and a definition that equates to the rational process of accumulation of wealth for reinvestment. However, it is difficult to ignore the striking differences between the two; this is hardly surprising due to Marx’s economic approach whereas Weber takes a more sociological and cultural approach. However, it is crucial to not divide these theorists using clear-cut borders of the economic versus cultural approach or likewise, the macro structure-shaping society vs the micro action theory approach. What should be recognized, is that both theorists attempt to understand the connections between modern capitalism and specific historical circumstances.…

    • 826 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays