Political Activities In The Renaissance

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This paper accounts for the reason why the Renaissance primarily flourished in Italy. The Renaissance is often described as a certain period in history, yet this periodization is contested by some historians as it is not as linear as the Age of King Louis XIV (Bartlett, p.2). Instead, the Renaissance is a fluid notion that sought to define stself according to the highly admired doctrines of ancient Greece and Rome as “urban, cosmopolitan, and often republican Italian scholars and statesmen” believed it to be a reflection of their own experiences, instead of the “rural, feudal, usually monarchical values of Medieval Europe” (Bartlett, p. 5). Although the start of Renaissance in Italy can be accounted to the geographical location of the Italian …show more content…
It gave the states the freedom to control their own economic system, a feature distinctive from the rigid practices prevalent in northern Europe and had resulted in the development of mercantile systems in Italian cities, ruled by wealthy merchant patriates. This revolutionary development saw the specialization of the the Italian merchants in quintessential capitalist techniques that aided the flourishing of business in the cities (Bartlett, p. 94). These presence of affluent and influential business men were gradually recognized by the cities around the early tenth century and eventually were recognized as reflective of the general population (Bartlett, p. 26). The cities also developed into urban centers that was self-governed by these influential, secular citizens who had authority over economic and social policies (Bartlett, p. 26). These independent communes, which were either a republic or principality, established itself and became the foundation in which the city-states of the Renaissance would prosper (Bartlett, p. …show more content…
The wealth of the Italian peninsula was generated by the commencement of the First Crusade in 1095, which also provided for the expansion of Italian cities (Bartlett, p. 26). The Crusade was called by Pope Urban II at Clermont in 1095 as a result of the rapid increase of population during the 10th century (Bartlett, p. 26). The population increase among the warrior nobility, along with the desire to expand trade, led to a confrontation between Europe and the Muslim states situated in the southern and eastern Mediterranean, which incited Europeans to seek materialistic and superficial desires, such as land and fame, and was guised in the name of religion (Bartlett, p. 26). Italian maritime states like Venice, Genoa and Pisa greatly benefitted from the Crusades as they were the major states that supplied the transportation, equipment, management, and loans to myriads of northern knights that went to the Holy Land from the states’ ports (Bartlett, p. 26). These Italian states helped transport armies of men and equipment across the Mediterranean, which helped cultivate the maritime. Moreover, states like Venice, Pisa and Genoa gained advantages from the Crusades as they made payments to the Church instead of participating as it gave the states instantaneous earnings and stimulated trade

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