Police Residency In University Police

1254 Words 6 Pages
Other studies indicate that males tend to hold more favorable view of the police than females (Brown and Coulter, 1983; Thomas & Hyman, 1977). Specifically, Thomas and Hyman (1977) noted that females were slightly more unfavorable in their attitudes towards the police than males. Nonetheless, various bodies of work suggest that gender has no effects on the perception of the police (Chow, 2012; Hurst and Frank, 2000). Residency is another important factor to consider when examining students’ attitudes towards the police. According to the official SUNY College at Buffalo website, more than 2,000 students live on campus in ten corridor, suite, and apartment-style campus residence halls. At SUNY College at Buffalo, as well as in other colleges, …show more content…
Students who live on campus are more likely to see University Police patrolling the dorms, academic buildings, and the surrounding campus area, which is a main function of police duty. This is often used by University Police to gain legitimacy. Patrolling and police visibility such as responding to calls for service makes a police organization look like they are doing their job and thereby provides legitimacy (Crank & Langworthy, 1992; Phillips & Gayadeen, 2014). In turn, students who observe University Police doing their job are more likely to be satisfied with campus police and feeling safe on campus. These students are often students who live on campus and who receive University Police services first hand. Students living off campus are often not aware of the many services provided by University Police, and are thereby more likely to be dissatisfied with University Police and feeling safe on campus. For example, Steinmetz and Austin (2014) found that male students who lived on campus were less fearful of crime than males who lived off campus (Steinmetz & Austin, 2014). Currie (1994) stated that women reported experiencing threatening incidents on campus at a much higher rate than men. Further …show more content…
The concern for safety has become prevalent in recent years, in part due to the high increase in the number of students attending college and universities, along with an increase in campus crime during the past 25 years (Griffith, Hueston, Wilson, Moyers, & Hart, 2004). Also, there is a higher perception of risk due to recent high profile cases covered in the media gaining national attention. Campus crime has always been a serious concern for students, parents, administrators and policy makers. In 1990 Congress responded by passing the Crime Awareness and Campus Security Act of 1990, followed by the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act in 1998 or otherwise known as the Clery Act, requiring all universities receiving federal funding to collect and publish campus crime data (Appendix I), crime prevention, and security policies and procedures on campus (Nobles, Fox, Khey & Lizotte, 2013; Karjane, Fisher, Cullen, 2002; Lane, Gover, & Dahod, 2009; Whissemore, 2015). In light of recent shootings, many colleges have responded by increasing security personnel, the use of campus lockdowns, expanding emergency communication systems using multiple notification routes, including text messages, e-mail, and phone alerts (Kaminski et al., 2010; Murr, 2007). Kaminski et al,. (2010) added that some campuses have gone a step further by

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