Police Brutality: Interview By Ta-Nehisi Coates

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In the interview that Ta-nehisi Coates has he brings up a few points that were every meaningful in the case of police brutality. Coates was first really aware of police brutality when a friend of his, Prince Jones, was killed. Jones was a fellow student at Howard University where Coates attended. Jones was driving one day through Maryland where he had just dropped of his daughter and was on his way to see his fiancée. While driving Jones was being followed by an undercover police officer dressed as a drug dealer. The police officer following Jones thought jones was someone else. After driving through Maryland, Washington, D.C and into Virginia, Jones was then killed. I believe that Jones execution was essential to Coates story and to his …show more content…
In that same region her ancestors had been enslaved. Dr. Jones integrated the high school in her town where at first she would have a hard time but then end up being class president. Dr. Jones later went to college on a full scholarship, she went to med school at Louisiana State University, she served in the navy and she took up radiology. Jones’ mother, Dr. Mable Jones, was a strong women who did not want to live the same life her ancestors had lived, she wanted something more. The death of her son was hard for her she describes the pain as an extremely physically painful that she felt like she was dying. I admire the strength Dr. Jones had after losing her son, there are many mothers who lose their son to the events that plague a person of color, like Dr. Jones said it was something she had to do on her own because she could not rely on her country for …show more content…
In "Message to the Grass Roots" Coates remembers a specific quote "Don’t give up your life. Preserve your life. It’s the best thing you have going. And if you’ve got to give it up, make sure it’s even-steven." it was a profound claim about the value of your body that was very important to Coates especially considering his upbringing. Marshall "Eddie" Conway was the former Black Panther leader in Baltimore, Maryland, who served 44 years for a murder he denies committing. Eddie Conway and the men in prison were one of Coates first memories as a child. These memories Coates has of visiting Conway in prison is essential to everything Coates had done as a journalist. Meeting these influential men was a big part of Coates life. Without these men in his life I feel that Coates wouldn’t have followed in his father’s footsteps as a political activism. Malcolm X and Eddie Conway were on of the reasons Coates was aware of the situation concerning the people of color. His eyes were open to all the unfairness, mistreatment and

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