Police Brutality In Detroit, Michigan

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Police brutality has long been a topic of discussion. Police brutality, a form of police misconduct, happens all around the world. In the United States, it has come to light more in recent years. A city especially known for police brutality is Detroit, Michigan. Detroit police officers kill or injure criminal suspects at a higher rate than other US cities including New York and Washington DC, cities known for high crime rates. Between the years of 1990 and 1998, police in Detroit had nearly ten fatal encounters per year, a high statistic with less than one million people residing in the city. Detroit became known for having a violent police force during the 1960s and 1970s, especially against minority youth. This trend held steady during …show more content…
The house was under surveillance by two plain clothes police officers, Larry Nevers and Walter Budzyn, because of suspected drug transactions. The officers order Green to get out of his vehicle. Green refused their request. Nevers and Budzyn then called for backup and they attempted to remove Green from his car. He resisted. One of the officers noticed Green had a clenched fist and they ordered him to open it. He did not comply and the officers began to hit his hand with their flashlights. As the officers were beating Green, another five officers arrived for back up. In the meantime, the beating had gone from Green’s fist to his head. One of the back-up officers, Robert Lessnau, joined in the beating. Sergeant Freddie Douglas, the ranking officer at the scene and the only black officer, did not take part in the beating but did not intervene with the other officers to help Green. The officers inflicted as many as 14 blows to Green’s head. His injuries included a badly torn scalp and skull fractures. A vial of crack cocaine was found in his possession. Later that evening, Malice Green died from the injuries inflicted by the …show more content…
The jury’s verdict for Officer Budzyn was reached on August 21st. Both of these verdicts would remain sealed until the jury in Officer Nevers’ case reached a verdict. That would come on August 23rd. Both Nevers and Budzyn were found guilty of second degree murder. Officer Lessnau was found not guilty. Nevers was sentenced to 12-25 years in prison with no parole until he served at least nine years and eight months. Officer Budzyn received 8 to 18 with no parole until he served at least six and a half years. Both officers requested out of state prisons due to the fact that they may have had a part in convicting the prisoners in Michigan. They were allowed to serve their terms in

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