Police Brutality In America Today

Superior Essays
Police brutality has become a common issue to talk about in today’s America. Americans today are against police brutality, but they don’t even know what it means. So, what is police brutality? Furthermore, The Law Dictionary states “Police Brutality is the use of excessive and/or unnecessary force by police when dealing with civilians.” Also, Americans often argue whether police brutality is targeting blacks or is the media just covering more on blacks then other Americans. Lastly, question and concern have been brought up on how to prevent police brutality significantly. Furthermore, Police brutality is racially motivated which can be prevented using non-lethal weapons such as Tasers and body cameras. Also, the government should be giving …show more content…
The Guardian also provides solid facts to back this claim. Furthermore, The Guardian states, “Overall in 2015, black people were killed at twice the rate of white, Hispanic and Native Americans. About 25% of the African Americans killed were unarmed, compared with 17% of white people. This disparity has narrowed since the database was first published on 1 June, at which point black people killed were found to be twice as likely to not have a weapon” (McCarthy and Laughland). This helps prove that unarmed blacks are being killed more over whites, surprisingly to some more than other minorities. When The Guardian states “twice” helps emphasize that black are being killed more when they are unarmed. Black men also make up a pretty large amount out those being killed due to police brutality. Furthermore, The Guardian also states, “Despite making up only 2% of the total US population, African American males between the ages of 15 and 34 comprised more than 15% of all deaths... Their rate of police-involved deaths was five times higher than for white men of the same age” (McCarthy and Laughland). This further proves that police brutality is racially motivated because even though black men only make up two percent of the US population they account for fifteen percent of all deaths on the use of deadly force which is five times more than white men. When McCarthy and Laughland use the word …show more content…
Tasers would make a great non-lethal weapon that should be used more than lethal force. Furthermore, Journalist Resource states, “Use of Tasers and other CEDs can reduce the statistical rate of injury to suspects and officers who might otherwise be involved in more direct, physical conflict — an analysis of 12 agencies and more than 24,000 use-of-force cases “showed the odds of suspect injury decreased by almost 60% when a CED was used”(Wihbey and Kille). Wihbey and Kille demonstrate how effective Tasers can be to reduce suspect injuries significantly. When they use the word “analysis” it appeals to ethos and logos which convince the readers that Tasers and CEDs can possibly stop police brutality. Today in America cameras can be accessible due to smartphones. Body cameras would make a huge difference in police brutality and easily provide evidence in courts. Furthermore, Journalist Resources states, “White of Arizona State University, identified five empirical studies on body cameras, and assesses their conclusions. In particular, a year after the Rialto, Calif., police [department] began requiring all officers to wear body cameras, use of force by officers fell by 60% and citizen complaints dropped by nearly 90%” (Wihbey and Kille). This shows that cameras will make the best difference in reducing police

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