Police Affiliation Hypothesis

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Structural or Affiliation Hypothesis is the second hypothesis on the causation of police corruption, an expansion of the Society-at-Large Hypothesis. Structural or Affiliation Hypothesis perceives that officers acquire a skeptical attitude when they begin to become aware that corruption and criminal conduct are not restricted to citizens who break the law, but are also seen among those categorized as law abiding citizens (Inciardi, 2010). Niederhoffer contends that officers become persuaded into corruption by watching the actions of senior officers and supervisors (Delattre, 2011). The eccentric conduct and the reaction to such conduct in law enforcement agencies start a cycle of corruption, however, new officers do not start out corrupt …show more content…
The Rotten Apple Hypothesis concept is that individual police officers within the department are bad, rather than the agency as a whole (Delattre, 2011). In other words the Rotten Apple Hypothesis asserts that a few bad officers participate in corruption, but overall the department is honest (Inciardi, 2010). It is concluded that the root of corruption in the Rotten Apple Theory comes from individual police officers lacking character (Withrow & Dailey, 2009). The Rotten Apple Theory suggests that police corruption comes from placing individuals in police positions that already possess the tendency to engage in corruption and failing to “weed out” applicants who are not fit for public service (Delattre, 2011). The Rotten Apple Theory is focuses around the concept that there are a few “rotten apples” in a police department and deviant behavior is isolated to a few individuals (Byers, …show more content…
Criminal conduct and deviant behavior occurs among police officers when there is a lack of morality and ethics among certain officers and this conduct has the potential to spread through the rest of the organization. Police corruption is a monster that will always exist. Police officers are given the tool of using discretion and although this is a good tool to possess, discretion sometimes can be the key that unlocks the door for corruption to enter. Police corruption undermines the public’s trust, morale will suffer, and the department’s reputation can ruin as an end result. Police corruption has been around for many years and will be around until the end of

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