Poetry In Langston Hughes's Let America Be America Again

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In Langston Hughes, poem “politics” (Thruston) and bringing everyone together was one of his main priorities to talk about in his poetry. Other of Langston Hughes 's poetry has been about his past and how to identify himself as a person in the time period when segregation was in the role. Everyone did not understand why a black African American man was writing in such a manner where he can get in a lot of hatred coming through and also can be in a lot of trouble with the authority. He uses imagery to express love in his poem between Black men and Black women, nature, romantic quandary, mother-daughter and father-son relations, friendship, and silences. “The romanticization of Africa is one of the basic characteristics of Hughes 's early poetry …show more content…
Each of these poems exemplifies political and modernist topics of showing identity in America and how to love one another no matter what race or gender. Hughes shows repetition, imagery and rhyme in these four poems. Hughes in the first poem, “Let America be America Again", shows repetition in almost all of his stanzas by saying "Let America be America again". In this poem he tells a story of how American is not the America in his eyes because of the struggle and the "freedom" of being an African American has not come true. Also in this poem he describes a white man and a black man in two different worlds, “I am the poor white, fooled and pushed apart, I am the Negro bearing slavery 's scars. I am the red man driven from the land, I am the immigrant clutching the hope I seek-- And finding only the same old stupid plan of dog eat dog, of mighty crush the weak". This just does not talk about blacks and white. It talks about a lot of different cultures who has dealt the feeling of not being free from the black or Negro man being a slave, a poor white man, and an immigrant, not just from Mexico but from all over the country that wanted to come to America so they can be free, just like the dream that they …show more content…
“Hughes sought to unite blacks and whites on this solid ground through his poetry” (Thurston), which drew on the tropes of proletarian literature and the tradition of African-American literature simultaneously to construct that ground and to bring various readers together upon it. His simultaneous political and poetic effectiveness, thus results from his ability to reach multiple audiences in a variety of contexts. In the third poem, "The Negro Mother", uses imagery and rhyme through the whole entire poem. This was reached the masses of the black people to show and describe what the Negro mother and slaves were "three hundred years in the deep South" (line 15). "Look at my face-- dark as the night-- Yet shining like the sun with love 's true light. I am the dark girl who crossed the red sea carrying in my body the seed of the free" (line 5-8) shows imagery because it describes the struggle of a young black girl who came over from the red sea to be a slave and also carrying a child that wants to be free or it can also mean that she has a hope of being free. “I nourished the dream that nothing could smother deep in my breast--the Negro

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