Plessy V. Ferguson And The 14th Amendment

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Just three years after the American Civil War started on May 18th, 1896, one of the most controversial cases happened: Plessy v. Ferguson. Where the famous " separate but equal" phase was born. At the time of 1860’s, the United States was at a divide between the North and the South, and the biggest difference between both sides was slavery, and the rights of African Americans. Yet a year later, the case of Plessy vs. Ferguson decided that the African Americans were on one of the lowest parts of the social scale. During the case of Plessy vs. Ferguson, separate but equal facilities were viewed as sufficient to satisfy the 14th amendment. Due to the idea that as long African Americans were viewed as citizens and given the exact same facility, …show more content…
Barbara Rose John, a young 16 year old girl, went to a school across town from a very nice white school. On winter days Barbara often had to sit in class with her jacket or attempt to get a seat near the fire in order to stay warm. To continue, the amount of school supplies and the facility of schools were extremely unequal. "Barbara John 's lawyers had to argue that school segregation violated a clause in the constitution barring states denying people the 'equal protection of the laws. '" (Tushnet 12). Barbara’s lawyers believed the best option was to prove that she was not given equal protection under the law, when her school soon became overcrowded and the need for supplies and a new high school was needed desperately. After going on strike among the other students attending school, and attracting more attention to the issue the NAACP expressed interest and help Barbara in getting a case at the federal court level. Barbara 's case was accompanied by Linda Brown’s …show more content…
Board, the hardest challenge Thurgood Marshall as going to face was by that explaining that the education faculties between African Americans and White are unequal. As a result the justices state, "We conclude that in the field of public education the doctrine of "separate but equal" has no place. Separate educational facilities are inherently unequal. Therefore, we hold that the plaintiffs and other similarly situated . . . are . . . deprived of the equal protection of the laws guaranteed by the Fourteenth Amendment." (Landmark Cases).The final decision of the Brown v. Board of Education, states that 14th amendment no longer applies in a school. As a result now segregation is now unconstitutional and integration is constitutional.As the country grew not only in size, more minds stepped up to the task of changing segregation and making people more aware of how the phrase "separate but equal" is separate and not equal. Chief Justice Warren 's opinion on Brown v. Board on education plays a huge role in convincing other justices on the supreme court. Chief Justice Warren states, "To separate them [children in grade and high schools] from others of similar age and qualifications solely because of their race generates a feeling of inferiority as to their status in the community that may affect their hearts and minds in a way unlikely to ever be undone. . . . Whatever may have been the extent of psychological knowledge at the time of Plessy v. Ferguson,

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