Playing God In Mary Shelley's Frankenstein '

1488 Words 6 Pages
Genesis 1:27 states, "God created man in his own image, in the image of God created he him". This biblical proclamation renders the belief that humans are created in God’s likeness, therefore, each is equal. Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein illustrates a similar biblical depiction of creation­ where the monster is made in the image of its creator. Using the body parts of dead humans, Victor Frankenstein successfully brings life to his creation, and discovers the secret to animation. In a sense Frankenstein is playing God, which eventually proves to be too much responsibility for him. Since its birth, the monster mirrors the lonely life of his creator because that is the only consistent example of how to live life. Their lives, and the their tragedies …show more content…
Reflecting on his childhood, Frankenstein describes his parents love for him and declares, "for a long time I was their only care"(41). The consistent compassion and attention given to Frankenstein renders an ideology of what a relationship should be. He accredits their dedication to the fact that they were the creators, in a sense, of their son's future: "it was in their hands to direct me to happiness or misery, according as they fulfilled their duties towards me"(40). It is amazing that Frankenstein does not use this a model of how he should care for the monster. By abandoning the creature he brought to life, Frankenstein condemns the monster to a life of loneliness. Frankenstein is an example of a parent who does not think about how their actions effect the growth of their child. Every parent fears their child will cause them harm or sadness, but absolute neglect is the only way to guarantee that someone will not be able to succeed. The process of creation obsesses Frankenstein, just as conception can overly excite the average …show more content…
Although Frankenstein attends university, he affirms that he "was, to a great degree, self-taught" (45). The monster, too, is self-taught which shows similarity between the creator and his creation that is based on his own image and likeness. The monster learns how to speak by observing and imitating a French family. He says, "My days were spent in close attention, that I might more speedily master the language" (105). In addition to learning how to speak, the monster learns how to read. He finishes texts, such as, Paradise Lost and The Sorrows of Young Werther, which also draw parallels to the story of creation. In this scenario both the creator and the creation study because in order to understand life. Frankenstein longs to find understanding in a scientific sense, while the creature discovers a more practical approach based on morals. With no obvious purpose, the monster feels that becoming a functioning member of society will bring him peace, as he attests, "I ardently desired to understand them [human], and bent every faculty towards that purpose"(104). Unfortunately for both, their studies end in pain, suggesting that the pursuit of knowledge will lead to personal destruction. During the process of creating his monster, Frankenstein secludes himself and abandons society and human contact. Even after the creation is complete Victor isolates himself even further because of

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