Plato's Love Of Wisdom

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Philosophy is commonly known as “the love of wisdom.” While Plato, who by no means neglected the importance of wisdom, would agree that this common belief is a part of philosophy, he showed it to be much more than that. “The love of wisdom” is an incomplete definition of philosophy. Through his Socratic dialogues, Plato sought to work through each incomplete definition of something to reach the essence of things, which is perhaps is another keystone of philosophy. But, if one were to consider the essence of philosophy, one would see how it becomes complex to define exactly what philosophy is. How does one find the essence of “the search for the essence of things”? In general, philosophy is simultaneously the search for an answer and the answer …show more content…
As said earlier, philosophy is not just a “love of wisdom.” First, it involves other virtues besides wisdom. This is shown through Plato’s exploration of the virtue of piety in the Socratic dialogue Euthyphro, and during Socrates’ defense in Apology, in which Socrates displays multiple virtues including courage, resilience and honesty in the face of immense adversity and even death. Since Plato and Socrates are philosophers, and they found it worthwhile to address these other virtues, philosophy must be more than just a “love of wisdom.” One might claim that wisdom could encompass these other virtues, and therefore at its core philosophy is still only a “love of wisdom.” But, virtues such as piety and honesty exist as separate virtues for a reason. When Socrates is discussing piety in Euthyphro, he does not turn the discussion into a one about the virtue of wisdom. He stays focused on what the definition of piety is, as its own concept. And even if it is true that wisdom encompasses the other virtues, the phrase “love of wisdom” would still be too limiting. It does not indicate the dualistic nature of philosophy: it can be an answer someone believes in, as in when someone has a personal philosophy, and a practice that someone participates …show more content…
Plato values the perplexity philosophical discussion often creates, because it gives people the desire to keep pursuing the truth or the answer until the feeling of perplexity is gone. These moments also give one the opportunity to acknowledge his own ignorance. Both of these involve truth and therefore the quest for the ultimate good of the soul. If one continues on this path, all the answers and searches for answers will come together and philosophy will bring their soul to its full potential of

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