Aristotle's Beliefs

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What was his Beliefs
Despite his relations to Plato and Socrates, Aristotle was more empirically- minded than Plato or Socrates and believed that in the purposefulness of education. According to Socrates and Plato, “the aim of education is to attain knowledge.” It was their belief that it was necessary both for the interest of the individual and the society, therefore it was virtue by itself. Aristotle however, believed that the aim of education was not only to attain knowledge but also to attain goodness or happiness in life. Aristotle admonishes that concern must be placed on both the ethical and the political. As human being we must question ourselves continually to find out what makes us grow. From doing this we should try to work for the good or right", rather than that which is merely “correct." He believed that virtue is embedded in the attainment of goodness or happiness. Aristotle divided “goodness”
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Aristotle believed that education was central and the fulfilled person was an educated person. Aristotle looked to both education through reason and education through habit. Habit refers to, learning by doing – ‘Anything that we have to learn to do we learn by the actual doing of it… We become just by doing just acts, temperate by doing temperate ones, brave by doing brave ones.’ (Aristotle Niconachean Ethics, Book II, p.91). Aristotle believed human nature, habit, and reason to all be equally important forces that must be polished in education. Unlike Socrates who placed emphasis on questioning his listeners to bring out their own ideas in the adults he taught. Aristotle however, considered repetition to be very important in developing good habits. It was his belief that the teacher must lead the students

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