How Does Joe Gargery Influence Pip's Childhood

Better Essays
Throughout his growth into early adulthood and his new life in London in Charles Dickens’ Great Expectations, Pip, the protagonist, is influenced by many characters. Joe Gargery, his sister’s husband, who Pip begins to resent once he starts living a wealthier life, but returns to loyally in the end; Miss Havisham, the vengeful old woman that Pip suspects to be his benefactor for the majority of the novel; Abel Magwitch, a convict, and Pip’s actual benefactor repaying him for his kindness as a child. All these characters play crucial roles in Pip’s life and shape him into who he is, but there is only one that arguably impacts him the most: Estella. Estella, raised by Miss Havisham to be a ruthless heart-breaker as her form of revenge on men, infatuates Pip from the moment he meets her, and immediately, he starts to see the differences between them. She is of a higher class, more sophisticated, and better educated; she looks down upon Pip. As a result, he feels shameful of himself and his status. “...and gave me the bread and meat without looking at me, as insolently as if I were a dog in disgrace. I was so humiliated, hurt, spurned, offended, angry, sorry…” (Dickens 75). In this way, Estella is the cause of his …show more content…
Even when she is not there, she lives in Pip’s mind, and is constantly brought up and reminded. Using various literary elements, Dickens helps develop the influence Estella has on Pip. As discussed before, the way she is characterized is crucial to this. Had she been a typical female character and had she treated Pip kindly, the plot would have taken a drastically different direction. By being the way she is, cold and merciless, she makes Pip want to change for her. Estella’s actions and attitude are the main cause of her influence on

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    Jane Austen uses Elizabeth’s wit, aptitude, and humor to show the contrast between her and Women in the Regency era, It was important for Jane Austen to do this because the literary world had never seen something like this before. Austen writes Elizabeth as a character who is cunning and smart. “There is a stubbornness about me that never can bear to be frightened at the will of others. My courage always rises at every attempt to intimidate me.” She possesses beliefs that were not commonly seen in the classic woman, of the time period, who epitomized a gentle passivity.. For example, Elizabeth values education and personality when looking for a suitor which is different than the character of, say, Charlotte, who looks for fortune and fame in…

    • 1016 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Naturally the husband becomes an adversary when he is not as per her fantasies. Adverse conditions faced by the female characters in the novels of Bharati Mukherjee are faced with clarity in case of Hannah Easton, with ferocity by Devi and resilience to survive by Jasmine and someone like Dimple ends up in a bloody quagmire and all of them face dislocation and mutation. Mukherjee’s women are constantly combating the unresolved contradiction between culture and location in order to exist in a world of ‘othernesses.’ This othernesses could not be limited to new culture, but in the process of the assimilation of the contraries, a silent rupture exist within their own identity. It is persistently the negotiation of self and other or the mutation outside, unleashes a split space which consists in the free play of dislocations and politics of…

    • 2620 Words
    • 11 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Throughout the book, Miss Havisham asks Pip about Estella and what he thinks of her. “From Estella she looked at me, with a searching glance that seemed to pry into my heart and probe its wounds. ‘How does she use you, Pip; how does she use you?’ she asked me again, with her witch-like eagerness” (Dickens 302). She wants Pip to fall in love with Estella, just for Estella to disappoint him and not marry Pip. Miss Havisham loved that Estella was getting into Pip’s head and heart and hoped that Estella was breaking his heart.…

    • 1055 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Pip begins feeling ashamed of his several things such as his “coarse hands” and his “thick boots” (Dickens 60). Pip allows the insulting remarks from Estella to affect him in such a way that he begins questioning his common life and wishes he was a gentleman such as in the following quote, “I wished Joe had been rather more genteelly brought up, and then I should have been so…

    • 790 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Any reader can conclude that Rebecca is indeed a main character of the story despite her absence. A deeper evaluation reveals that the opinions or rather the technique used by the author were molded by the perceptions of the society at the time when the book was written. It is essential to note that most female gothic literature exposes the predicaments that women face in their day to day lives. This story sheds some light on how the perceptions of evil people can slow down the progress and growth of an individual and especially those who are perceived to be weak in the societal order, like the…

    • 1470 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Tendular And Gargi Analysis

    • 3859 Words
    • 16 Pages

    Sakharam Binder is a Brahmin who hates his upbringing and exists in a society which he loathes. But, he has no qualms about benefiting from its unfairness. He brings to his hovel, women who have been "discarded by their husbands" and gives them "a roof over their heads, two saris a year and food in their belly." In return, they have to perform all the "wifely duties", including sharing their bodies. He is unapologetic about his sexual appetites and is uncontrollably violent during his rages, when he gives the women "what they deserve".…

    • 3859 Words
    • 16 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Her knowledge of this is displayed through her obsession with the wallpaper and the woman within it. She recognizes the abnormality of her fixation to the inanimate object yet cannot prevent it. She personifies her mental issues through the woman in the wallpaper. At the end of the story when the narrator says “I’ve got out at last…” (Gilman), portrays the theme of freedom. Women didn’t have much of a choice at the time; but, this symbolizes the narrator breaking free of the norm and finally doing what was best for…

    • 1075 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Women were belittled and looked down on. This role was also portrayed in Trifles. Both Antigone and Mrs. Hale possess character traits that set them aside from other women in their eras. Even though women were portrayed in this way, both Antigone and Mrs. Hale fight for what they believe is right. Antigone brakes the social norm and fights for what she believes is correct.…

    • 1012 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    In Great Expectations by Charles Dickens the main character learns an important lesson due to a string of events in the book. Starting Pip’s life, he is brought up by hand by his sister and her husband Joe, for both his parents are dead. Pip and Joe are the best of friends and always have each others backs when Pip’s sister is in a foul mood. Later in Pip’s life, he goes to live with Mrs. Havisham for a little while. At Mrs. H’s Pip is introduced to different ways in which people live.…

    • 1024 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Furthermore, each time he ate more pie, he felt more guilt than happiness, because he explained that he felt bad for not sharing with Cross-Eyed Johnny, who was really Jesus. Near the end of “The Pie,” Gary said that “Mrs.Hancock...knew. My mom...knew” (Soto paragraph 7). This showed that Gary had finally realized after eating his pie that he was guilty. This is because he had a sense of paranoia.…

    • 790 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays