Carlo Collodi's Adaptation Of Pinocchio

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To most audiences the story of Pinocchio is a lighthearted one, filled with the adventures of a jovial puppet and his cricket conscience with the occasional unnerving scene. Yet this is not the dark and death defying tale that author Carlo Collodi originally wrote in his 1883 novel. As is the case with many Disney adaptations, the original story of Pinocchio has been erased from the public consciousness and replaced by that of the adaption. This erasure is due to the quality of the film and its impact on popular culture. In addition, modern adaptations employ the modifications made by the 1940 film while eschewing the darker aspects of the original novel. Furthermore, the sheer cultural and economic power of its creator company, the “Disney …show more content…
Collodi’s narrative is rather demented and bitter. Due to this contrast, producers chose to base their adaptations after the kid-friendly Disney adaption rather than the original. The original Pinocchio is laced with cruel scenes that are rather inappropriate for a children's story. In chapter 4, for example, Pinocchio crushes the sagious “Talking Cricket” with a hammer. In the film, however the “Talking Cricket” is the now famous “Jiminy Cricket” and acts as Pinocchio’s kindhearted conscious. Author Carlo Collodi originally wanted to end the story with the poor puppet hanging from a tree. Hanged by the characters of Fox and Cat (Honest John and Gideon in the Film) disguised as assassins. Collodi’s description of this horrible event is graphic “A few minutes went by and then a wild wind started to blow. As it shrieked and moaned, the poor little sufferer was blown to and fro like the hammer of a bell. The rocking made him seasick and the noose, becoming tighter and tighter, choked him. Little by little a film covered his eyes.”(ch15) This part of the book, along with most other explicit content was omitted from the Disney adaption, and with good reason. The few remaining violent scenes are reactions to the puppet’s most grievous sins, such as not going to school, and partaking in the sins of “Pleasure island”. Collodi’s editors had a similar mindset to Disney when they forced him to write a more pleasant ending. One where the “Fairy …show more content…
In classrooms the original story of Pinocchio is seen as strange and off putting. It is not for the demented content within the book, rather it is the contrast between the original work and the Disney rendition which astounds us. The public is no longer aware of Collodi’s vision due to the 1940 film’s success as a piece of art. The film was too influential culturally for the novel to keep up. Leading many to be unaware of its existence. Any other adaption would be taking a risk if they tried to emulate the comparatively dark novel, so instead producers follow the successful and kid-safe Disney adaption. The branding power of the “Disney Corporation” allowed the film to become the standard edition of the Pinocchio fairy tale. When put against one another the 1883 novel was out-marketed and underexposed. While still one of the most popular books of all time, the public is now blinded to Pinocchio’s original adventure by the big

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