Pierre Trudeau's Influence On Canada In The 1960s

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American political views were starting to have an influence on Canada throughout the 1960s. Tired of traditional political leaders, many Canadians admired the charisma, humour, and determination of the handsome and young John F. Kennedy. As Canada’s centennial approached and optimism was again reaching the peak, many Canadians were ready for a new modern style in their Prime Minister. In 1967, many Canadians believed that they had found it in the new Federal Liberal Party leader, Pierre Elliott Trudeau. This modern charisma hit Canada with the rise of Pierre Trudeau, who was a new type of Canadian politician. He touched the lives of many Canadians; inspiring them to believe they were capable of achieving several things. Trudeau’s triumphs impacted …show more content…
Considering his views towards Quebec, Trudeau said in 1968, “I am trying to put Quebec in its place, and the place of Quebec is in Canada.” Prior to becoming Prime Minister, Trudeau, was concerned about Quebec’s political state. To help the French feel more comfortable and accepted, Trudeau had made numerous comments towards the problem. He said, “Canada will be a strong country when Canadians of all provinces feel at home in all parts of the country, and when they feel that all Canada belongs to them.” Trudeau also created a French magazine, which he named, “Cité Libre” (Community of the Free), which gave details about democracy to help the citizens in Quebec. With his “Just Society”, Trudeau made it a main concern to make French Canadians feel more satisfied in civilization. With this in mind, Trudeau passed the Official Languages Act in 1969; making English and French Canada’s official languages. This act made a major difference in federal workplaces who served in both languages; accordingly, English administration employees were trained on how to speak French. The act made sure that services were providing in French in regions where there was at least ten percent of population who spoke French. Trudeau wished the French culture and heritage would balance the equality among English and French. Trudeau’s attempt to ease the strain between French and English Canadians was …show more content…
Even before he was Prime Minister, Trudeau made a difference to the public. As Justice Minister of Canada, he guaranteed that most Canadian workers are to be covered by unemployment insurance benefits; he prohibited the death penalty in 1976. In Canada’s early history, all abortions were illegal, the Criminal Law Amendment Act, 1968-1969, legalized abortion if it was necessary for physical or mental well-being of the mother and had to be signed off by a committee of doctors. Trudeau later said, “Legislation…to reduce restrictions on abortion, divorce, gambling, and homosexuality”, this was all because he believed in an individual’s freedom. After winning Liberal Leadership in 1968, Trudeau said, “Canada must be unified, Canada must be one, Canada must be progressive, and Canada must be a just society”. At the time society was throwing up problems all the time, back then, it was about divorce, abortion, family problems, pollution, etc . Continuing to influence Canada, the parliament passed the Divorce Act (1968); it established a uniform divorce law across Canada. Due to Trudeau’s enthusiasm and charismatic character, he became a celebrity and Trudeaumania began. Screaming fans, both young and the old, rushed to his rallies and also demanded autographs. Continuing to influence Canada, Trudeau passed the Election Act, which dropped the minimum age of twenty one to eighteen years old to vote. He also

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