Analysis Of Piaget's Stages Of Development

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Despite being flawed, Piaget made exceptional contributions to the outlook we have on sensorimotor stages. He outdid those of his time, as most brilliant people who make history do, and his research paved an outline for others to do additional research on. Without the fundamentals of Piaget’s theories we may not have built upon the knowledge of these stages quite as quickly nor as proficiently. The stages of development Piaget recognized led to progression in the way we educate children, and led to changes when other psychologists research showed that some of the concluding factors Piaget came to were incorrect, and required a bit of fine-tuning. Nonetheless, there is no denying that his work was advantageous for psychology. The sensorimotor, …show more content…
In my opinion, it is important to allow children to utilize their vivid imaginations for as long as possible. Too often schools want to tame this human element, but it should be embraced by teachers and education system. As a teacher I would allow them to role play in the classroom because it gives the children the opportunity to have fun, and learn. For example, if I was reading a book I could assign parts the children and let them act out a particular scene as a character. It would have to be quite simple though, because the preoperational stage ends at a mere seven years old. Since children in this stage are egocentric they should be widely encouraged to share and show compassion. For example, it is not uncommon for elementary school teachers to have small animals in the classroom for the children to care for. This exercise encourages responsibility and selflessness. The best way to teach a person is to make the situation or assignment appeal to their interests. Moving along to the latter half of this stage to the older children it would be beneficial for reading assignments to allow the children the opportunity to choose material that peaks their interest. Piaget was concerned with the tasks children could not perform yet based off of the stage they were in. Even so, egocentrism can be combatted with these techniques. Compassion …show more content…
This is the period where imagination is still present, but logic begins to be more apparent. The age of seven is commonly known as the age of reason. Where one can consider the effects their behavior has on others. These kids should be encouraged to organize concepts into groups. For instance they could be given words, and figure out which one does not belong. Inductive logic should also be taken into account and children can be taught something specific that they can apply to a more general situation. Unlike in the preoperational stage Piaget realized that children in the concrete operational stage are about to examine and multiple aspects of issues presented to them rather than focusing on just one problem. In other words, they can see all of the pieces to a puzzle and understand how they fit, and to an extent why it fits. As stated before the imagination should be cherished for as long as possible, so teachers should attempt to embrace that as well as the newfound

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