Piaget's Stages Of Development Analysis

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Cognitive development can also be referred to as a constructivist theory as it describes that individuals understand their surroundings and experiences by previous information of what they have experienced or done. Adolescents sometimes based their dissimilar experiences on their personal way of understanding and information of those experiences. Piaget’s foundation for condition was a scheme. Piaget believed a scheme is a systematic arrangement of an action or thought. It is a broad concept and can refer to “organized patterns of physical action such as an infant reaching to grasp an object, or mental action such as a high school student thinking about how to solve an algebra problem (Cook & Cook 2005:6)”.

Piaget’s four stages consisted
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Children of 1 year 6 months seldom require this type of symbolic play or the imagination to represent an object as an alternative. Later on by the age of 2, children now may use items far less alike to the actual thing. Lastly, by 5 years children are accomplished in using basically everything as imaginary. A child’s capacity to intellectually characterise items has now progressed to the point that the symbol no longer has to bear any resemblance to the original item (Corrigan, 1987). Piaget notes that the kinds of play specified the children’s degree of their mental capabilities. This aids in their participation in exercise and contributes to them becoming more skilful in their cognitive abilities (Cook & Cook …show more content…
This stage varies from ages of 11 to 12 years. The notion that adolescences may mature subsequently at the age of 12 but there is still some debate that that many don’t progress to the Formal Operational stage. Difference in the development of the thought processes of pre-logical thought of children to logical thought of adolescences is displayed in this stage. Concrete can be defined as “the child’s continued dependence on the ability to observe and manipulate elements to solve problems (Newman & Newman 1986:57)”. Children at this level of pre-logical thought process could explain the concrete problems that exist presently by use of intellectual rational thinking. Nonconcrete complications that are hypothetical or maybe purely verbal and or could involve multiple concepts are problematic and can’t be solved at this stage (Cummings 1995:120). As also believed by Burns and Silbey that “children tend to think that the manipulations they do with models are one method for finding a solution and pencil-and-paper math is entirely separate” (Burns & Silbey 2000:60). These are the following skills that can be developed in this

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