Physician-Assisted Suicide Is Always Wrong Analysis

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Commotion where there is no more motion, but there is a choice. According to Ryan T. Anderson the author of “Physician-Assisted Suicide is Always Wrong,” states that this upcoming proclamation is an ethical battle within our society. The main argument Anderson claims is that there is no base for such right to be implemented. There is no right way to kill someone, killing, especially coming from a health professional is going against the norm of centuries of helping to prolong life; give the body a fair chance to fight and survive. The author states, the solution is better health care provided for the families and patients. Once society chooses whom it classifies to be enabled for this deathly assistance we are putting a dark shadow over their …show more content…
These examples come from the Heritage Foundation report, for ethical reasons. They included a survey conducted where other countries have experience negate of patients which took this option of assisted suicide. The second, reason is the trust is lost between the physician and patient, which includes help from insurance professionals. The third, psychological dilemma is with the self-inflicting victim pattern of patient feeling useless and family feeling obligated to ease the burden. The last thing Anderson claims in the main points is we cannot measure the worth of a patient by disease or long term death diagnosis. The author is really trying to appeal using only moral point of views no logical attempt is …show more content…
“In response, activists are using these stories to advance legislation…” (Anderson.) This case was actually talked about because it was a great example of where this law PAS could give some families relief of the stressful wait of death taking away their family member. As I recall the story of Brittany Maynard this was an option and this decision was not taken alone but with other members of her family. She also did not take this option as her primary choice but researched, waited, and exhausted all her health and monetary. In my own view of family values it would be painful to see someone die with horror in their eyes. I think this is where the part about “dying with dignity,” comes from in Maynard’s story. In my experience I have seen people close to me die of cancer and have had a situation where my aunt had exhausted all resources and strength. This Anderson completely ignores and moves along. However, I do agree that if not regulated and made clear by law, this can sit of the edge on a line our society that must not be crossed. Once we will cross that line we value life so care free and we will find ourselves in the battle with our own saviors and once called heroes, our physicians. In conclusion, as I reflected in thought I would like to agree with Anderson but he presented no logical evidence. We cannot base this vast

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