Physician Assisted Suicide Essay

841 Words 4 Pages
Most people who attempt suicide are mentally ill and make impaired judgements. Many of those who are wishing to commit suicide are really just looking for help, and disorders such as depression can lead to even higher desire to commit suicide. Today in the United States of America, Oregon and Washington are the only states that have legalized physician assisted suicide. The real question is should physician assisted suicide be legalized in all 50 states. Dr. Jack Kevorkian, graduated from University of Michigan Medical School in 1952. He proposed an idea of giving murderers a choice of being executed by anesthesia so that their bodies can be donated to science and their organs as well. In the late 1980’s, after an unsuccessful …show more content…
Kevorkian resisted his own idea of giving death row inmates a choice. He was invited to a California Legislature bill that enables prisoners to donate their organs and die by anesthetics instead of gas or electricity. This experiment was energized by the attention of lawmakers and the news media. Later, in 1987, Kevorkian visited the Netherlands to study techniques the Dutch doctors used to assist in the suicides of the terminally ill without legal authorities. Dr. Kevorkian began advertising in area newspapers for a new medical practice. He called it “bioethics and obituary” which in some way or another provided families with “death counseling”. After creating his own homemade suicide machine he showed it to reporters to see what they would think about the environment of the experiment and also the drugs used. These drugs would paralyze the heart and allowed the patients to end their …show more content…
According to the statute, “A person is guilty of promoting a suicide attempt when he knowingly causes or aids another person to attempt suicide.” Punishment for conviction was five years’ imprisonment along with a $10,000 fine. Another act or statute in Washington, the Natural Death Act, provided, “Withholding or withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment” at a patient’s direction “shall not, for any purpose, constitute a suicide.” Many physicians and their terminally ill patients began to bend and challenge the constitutionality of the assisted suicide law. These plaintiffs claimed “the existence of a liberty interest protected by the Fourteenth Amendment which extends to a personal choice by a mentally competent, terminally ill adult to commit physician-assisted

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