Philosophy Of Being A Counselor

1333 Words null Page
It was not until my mid-thirties that I embraced a relationship with Jesus, and my life has yet to be the same. For years I questioned why I was born, and felt there was very little purpose to my life, which made me feel very alone. Yet, this was fortunately not the case, and as I surveyed my life from past to present, God was always present and active throughout my life, in spite of my lack of awareness of Him. Suffice it to say, I have finally allowed my mind and spirit to be open to receiving what my calling is, and have acknowledged my Creator’s plans for me. Being a counselor and possible leader, or mentor, has been a passion of mine since I was young, and I can recollect that I always enjoyed hearing people’s stories. Throughout …show more content…
The prior lifestyle I was entrenched in depicted a person who was in short supply of faith, direction, and self-respect. The combination of these ingredients made it nearly impossible for me to believe that I had a specific purpose set aside for me, let alone a divine calling. I quit college, entered the work force for about 20 years, and although I never really looked back, I never really looked forward either. Needless to state, I was not in a relationship with Christ for many years, and viewed myself as more agnostic. In this respect, my mindset paralleled that of an orphan. and I saw my life as very independent of any higher cause or being. However, I was drawn to letting people share their life situations with me, and was complimented on being a good listener. Yet, in my own personal life I was deficient in long-term goals, and the future appeared more bleak, rather than promising. This backdrop provides insight into where my mental, emotional, and spiritual status was, but Christ changed all of …show more content…
A narrow mind will most likely lead to limited and biased knowledge, and people deserve more than cookie-cutter answers and watered-down guidance. God has taken a metaphorical crow-bar and opened my mind and heart, and shown me how small I had let my world become, both mentally and emotionally. As I read the aspects that comprise a sonship mentality, I was drawn to all of them and feel they are essential to successful leadership. Humility needs to occupy the space that was filled with jealousy, and personal success should take a backseat to serving others (Frost & Frost, n.d.). If am going to be a person that people turn to for direction, the source of my light, strength, and wisdom need to all come from a solid foundation. This will be based off of my relationship with God, life lessons, my professional business experience, and my education including the study of disciplines such as philosophy, psychology, and theology. There can be much value in having the capability to analyze a situation or problem by using more than one resource and perspective, because it usually takes more than one tool to most efficiently get the job

Related Documents