Philadelphia State Hospital Case Study

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Register to read the introduction… Byberry was built in at the rural area of Byberry, a town near Philadelphia in 1906. From 1910 to the mid 1920's, construction on the rural aslyum began to progress greatly. The new renovations and additions included an infirmary, kitchens, several dormitories, laundry, administration, and two coal power plants. More than ten massive structures were built to house the countless number of patients that were flooding into Byberry. The official title of the asylum was The Philadelphia Hospital for Mental Diseases, which officially opened in 1907. The population of patients quickly grew, but with this increase came tales of neglect and abuse. Insufficent funding posed problems for Philadelphia Hospital, which began to quickly deteriorate in its early life. Patients began sleeping in hallways due to overcrowding and raw sewage was found on the floors of the bathrooms upon inspection of the …show more content…
Pennhurst laid down its roots in the quiet land of Chester County and opened its doors to the mentally disturbed in 1908. Pennhurst housed both adults and children with mental and physical disabilities in this sprawling campus. Most of the children were sent to Pennhurst by their parents; most never came back to see their children and left them to rot within the confines of the facility. Patients were separated into different buildings according to their intelligence levels. Some patients were able to almost function fully on their own, while others could not feed or bathe themselves. Severely disturbed patients were given orders to lie in cribs all day, while restrained, with their faces pressed into the matresses. The story of patient abuse at Pennhurst was far worse than that of Philadelphia State Hospital. Patients at Pennhurst were treated inhumanely and lived in horrid …show more content…
The public could watch on their black and white television screens as patients rocked back and forth, twitched, and paced at the Chester County asylum. The public was shocked at the mistreatment of patients and caused an uproar. By the late 1960's, Pennhurst had been open for nearly fifty years housing almost three thousand patients, most of which were children. In 1977, the instituion was found guilty of violating patient's constitutional rights. Patients were beaten, sexually assulated, and isolated for long periods of time. This isolation and abuse caused many of the adults and children to regress further and further into a mentally disturbing state of mind instead of being rehabilitated by the

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