Persuasive Essay On Veganism

1541 Words 7 Pages
Veganism is the lifestyle of “health and purity”, or so it is raved to be. But once one takes the strict way of life too far the situation becomes all too dangerous. Over obsessiveness within the diet from recovering patients allows for disorders to be maintained or perhaps, become even worse. Veganism is a variety of vegetarian diet that eliminates meat, eggs, dairy foodstuffs and all additional animal-derived ingredients. Many vegans as well do not eat foods that are processed using animal products, for instance refined white sugar in addition to some wines (vegetarian). This lifestyle is about saving the animals and taking care of yourself and the planet. One might argue this lifestyle is harmless and actually quite amazing, but it has a …show more content…
In a 2011 study Some we Love, Some we Hate, Some we Eat: Why it’s so Hard to Think Straight about Animals, Hal Herzog quotes a former vegetarian anorectic called Staci who notes that as a youth, “being a vegetarian was a way for me to have more control over my body by taking the fat out of my diet,” and she notes as well that vegetarianism fascinated her because of its’ “righteousness”: “at that age, you want to have something that is strong and clear and righteous” (Herzog, Hal). This eating style centers on the absence of animal products and abundance of fruits and vegetables. While these “whole and pure” foods can be healthy, they also give false reassurance that one is eating enough. Whether “eating enough” means eating 200 calories of cucumber or 2000 calories of nuts, seeds and nutritionally viable vegetables. Plant-based foods tend to be low in calories, high in volume. This ultimately leads to eating less more freely, while the world watches blind to the destruction one is putting their body through. These foods, such as apples are very easy to count the calories of, which is bad news to the disordered. Apples vary from 56-110 calories depending on the size. Prior knowledge of calorie count in foods that was picked up during ones time of disordered eating really affects how they behave around food and during recovery. Full recovery is hard when restrictive habits hang …show more content…
Even among students of normal-weight (based on BMI), 19% believed that they were too fat, and 12% of students reported attempting to lose weight” (Boyce, W. F., King, M. A. & Roche, J./ nedic). The struggle with body image is very prevalent amongst adolescents, which leads to full-blown eating disorders if the desire for “the perfect body” is strong enough. The problem with the desire of the perfect body is that it is unattainable without some sort of obsession. Obsessions are not healthy for the mind and really attach to one like a leash keeping one inside of a small cage all throughout their life time. In anorexics for example, they desire the idea of thinness and even after many months, even years, these obsessive thoughts of “That is too many calories,” or “How long will that take to burn off?” still haunt the recovering patient. In the case that the disordered begin to gain weight all of the feelings of low self-worth and menacing voices in ones’ head sinisterly saying “I am a fat pig,” will return. They will return with a slap, and the disordered will fall into the same trap they were in before of restrictive eating, low self-worth and body dysmorphia, and overall worsened disorder. Recovering patients often turn to veganism. One then deceive ones’ loved ones into believing that they are recovering through veganism, when rather they are maintaining disordered habits.

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