Moral Obligation Essay

Decent Essays
Individual responsibility for implementing human rights varies based on a person’s belief about their moral obligations. Most people have similar ideas that if you see something and you can do something, then you should. However, some believe that it is one’s obligation to always do everything they can to help. Singer, Nager, and Young all discuss different types of personal responsibility. I support Singer’s argument the most, but to a slightly lesser extent.
Singer writes about the idea that if it possible to help someone without causing harm to yourself, then you are morally obligated to do everything in your power to do so. I think that while it is your moral obligation, there is a certain point where it is unreasonable to continue to
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There is a minimum level of humanitarianism that is the minimal standard for everyone. But, if one wants to be guaranteed ultimate protection, then they need to establish themselves within a community. States speak and act on our behalf, so we are guaranteed justice. When a state acts, citizens legitimate it. So, in order for state acts to be accepted, the laws must be just and fair. Meaning that, you must live within a state with a rule of law or you will have no possibility of justice. From this, Nager takes away the idea that it is important to improve and support your own country. Thus, you don’t owe anyone anything outside of your state. I agree that it is important to help the people around you, in order to better your state. However, in countries, such as the United States, the humanitarian issues are very different from those in countries like Cuba or Ethiopia. Once you have helped to improve the lives around you, I believe it is your moral obligation to branch out and help others that are unable to help …show more content…
Liability is something that you do, and so you are responsible for the consequences. Political responsibility is when someone in power is responsible because they did not act in the people’s best interest. There are three things that make up our social position and helps us to identify the responsibilities we have. This is our connections, our power, and our privilege. Young believes that our social connection can leave us responsible for injustices. She talks about sweatshops and unfit working conditions that are happening within our own state. Also, she talks about the idea that responsibility is forward looking, meaning that it is more important to take preventative measures than to try and correct what has been in just in the past. I agree with her that it is important to help injustices. But, I do not agree that there is a responsibility because of social connection. If you are buying shoes from a company and you find out they are implementing unfit working conditions, then Young says it is your job to stop supporting this company. But, I think that it is more political responsibility and upholding workers’ rights is part of the government’s job. I disagree with Young because I think you are not personally responsible for the unjust acts that occur under the

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