Retrospective Analysis Of Personality Analysis

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Retrospective Analysis of Personality
It is interesting to note how different our personal view changes when we dedicate some time to dissect and analyze any part of the process for thinking and making decisions. From an optimistic point of view, it offers a glimpse of reality and an opportunity to evaluate if what is been examined is celebration worthy, acceptable or unacceptable and changeable. To glance beyond what is there and look at the possible causes and circumstances that made that reality possible.
Throughout my life I have wondered if my personality is based on what I am made of, my DNA or what I have experienced growing up, maturing and getting older. There are many things when looking back that seem to have been there from the
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Nurture adds the rest of the ingredients needed for us to mold who we become as we experience life and grow with it. The question is how much of who we are is due to our genes and how much of it do we owe to our environment. Those who believe in the nurture theory may agree that our genes influence our abstract traits but it is our environment that influences our behavior over time. Is our development dependent on our DNA, or is there validity to the fact that our life experiences and immediate surroundings influence it. The main agreement is that both nature and nurture play significant roles in human development but the argument will continue to exist no matter how much the subject is looked at depending on the viewer’s vantage …show more content…
This is the reason why scientific studies on any subject not just Psychology are more valuable and widely accepted than personal experience and anecdotes. Professionals in the specific subject matter make decisions on how to best control the studies to prevent biases and errors or misjudgments. Every aspect of the study from inception to end is recorded in such a way that peers can recreate the exact scenario without having the option to recreate the study physically. The goal of a study is to create theories and to test those theories with microscopic precision without feelings or external thoughts just facts. When it comes to personal experience and anecdotes; they are full of biases and void of details. The only view available is that of the witness with the train of thought and mood that they had at the moment and every time the story is shared causes it to change even if just one bit at a time therefore making the information

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