Marxism In Brave New World

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“Everyone belongs to everyone else,” exclaims the voice in the dream of the innocence in Aldous Huxley’s future world - the hypnopaedic observation deterring singleness in friendship and love (Huxley, 35). In a sense in this “brave new world,” Huxley illustrates a society to achieve a state of stability, a loss of individuality, and the undoing of Mother Nature must occur. Along the extensive use of hypnopaedic training, fetal conditioning, and the ability of convention, any individual can be shaped into a commutable part in the society, which tends to be beneficially strict for the desire of creating something ‘smoothly.’ In such a world, uniqueness is uselessness and uniformity is bliss, because social stability is everything. Successfully …show more content…
In complex settings, such as in Brave New World, society primarily relies on technology, which continuously begins to control human behavior upon social and ethical limitations. Social control has altered to be more extensive and casts a much larger shadow, allowing control to become an expansionary trend. In the use of science and technology for purposes of social control, to enforce humanistic norms by avoiding infractions, has only served to saturate modern society amongst the standardized idea of ‘stability’ (Marx). In result, Brave New World includes the horrifying possibility that influence in the sciences of biology and psychology could be change by a totalitarian government that could cause difference between the way homosapiens think and act. As described in the novel, technology refers to the tools and applications developed from science; while science is knowledge, but yet technology is the action taken based upon the given knowledge (Marx). On the other hand, the overruled control of technology affects the consumer society …show more content…
Consequences seem slim; which because of state control there is an inevitable loss of morals, feelings, character, and beliefs - a sudden defeat of humanity. The dystopia belonging in Brave New World expresses that the human spirit will always yearn; only the controllers of society have the freedom of choice. Vastly, Huxley defines freedom through the perspectives that caution freedom. Everyone else has been conditioned from birth to accept unquestionably all the beliefs and values of the ordered society (Schermer). Upper-class Alphas are given the privilege of little freedom because their high intellect makes it more difficult for them to fully agree with the guidelines of society: they are occasionally able to travel to the Indian reservation to explore how outsiders live. Exposure to an ‘inferior’ and ‘primitive’ society will eventually release any suspicions about their personal society’s power. Bernard constraints freedom as he conversates with Lenina, but she argues that most have a healthy deal of freedom - “to have a wonderful time” (Huxley, 92). While Bernard argues there is no such thing as freedom ever existing, and that freedom is only represented apart from the rest of society. He acts to be free in his “own way… not in everybody else’s way” (Huxley, 91). However, dissidents who want these freedoms are

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