Canadian Response To Refugees Research Paper

Superior Essays
A refugee can be described as any individual who is outside of their country of residence, and who is unable or reluctant to return to their country of origin because they will be, or they have a fear of being, persecuted. Persecution in the case of refugees is hostility or ill-treatment based on whom an individual is or their beliefs (textbook). Most refugees come from war torn countries, where rebel groups and armies exploit and abuse civilian populations, and refugees flee from these harmful situations in search of safety (voices from the front line article). In order to fully understand what a refugee is in Canada, the historical development of refugees in Canada must be outlined, with specific attention being placed on their admission …show more content…
Policy surrounding the admission refugees is extremely important to social work with refugees, as it determines the treatment and assistance refugees are able to receive, and whether or not they have the ability to seek asylum in Canada. Canada is believed to be a great nation in terms of protecting and accepting refugees. However, history shows that in the past Canadian response to refugee admission was largely negative. For a large portion of Canadian history, policy surrounding migration discouraged most non-European refugee claimants (textbook). The most important example of Canada’s negative reaction to refugees, is the treatment of refugees during wartimes. This paper will outline the treatment of refugees during wartime to exemplify how Canadian social structures were largely discriminatory to …show more content…
Post-war reactions to refugee admission were also largely negative, and restrictions were placed on allowing admission to displaced individuals that were affected by war. This shows how numerous Canadian social structures were very adamant against refugees being allowed entry into Canada (http://ccrweb.ca/sites/ccrweb.ca/files/static-files/canadarefugeeshistory4.htm). The Immigration Act of 1976 is also very important as it described refugee policy, and incorporated numerous categories of refugees that were outlined in Geneva Conventions. However, categories of refugees were now deemed “inadmissible” in this act because it was believed that they would be a burden on social and health services. So, refugees could be denied access not based on need and fear, but on health problems (textbook). This impacted social work with refugees, as refugees were now being banned from Canada and couldn’t receive social services from social workers. Another piece of legislation that exemplifies the historical development of refugees in Canada, is the Immigration and Refugee Act. Under the Immigration and Refugee Act, the Canadian government started designating the United States of America as a “Safe Third Country”. Meaning that refugee claimants could not make a

Related Documents

  • Superior Essays

    Unwanted Warriors Summary

    • 1624 Words
    • 7 Pages

    Discussing historical memory of the Great War, Clarke argues that many of the restrictions on enlistment in Canada were unnecessary and discriminatory. However, in arguing for this, Clarke neglects his perspective and fashions his argument in the present through misguided assertions supported with twisted facts. Comparing the test of health administered by officials to those today, Clarke mocks the…

    • 1624 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Superior Essays

    “The great themes of Canadian history are as follows: Keeping the Americans out, keeping the French in, and trying to get the Natives to somehow disappear.” - Will Ferguson Throughout Canadian history we’ve discriminated against non-anglo-saxon groups of people on many occasions. Although we are now known as a country that accepts all cultures and races, we haven’t always been deserving of that status. During World War I, World War II, and post-war times we treated other ethnic groups unfairly and because of this Canada does not deserve its multicultural reputation. Canada’s army limited who could fight, be treated with respect, and be acknowledged in the army during World War I, depending on their ethnic background. To begin, all Canadian…

    • 1815 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The dual identity that allows balance in the lives of immigrants and their children likely cannot work the same way for Indigenous Peoples. For immigrants who move to Canada, the dual identity is a way of keeping true to their homeland while adapting to their new home. Therefore, how can Indigenous people do this when this is both their homeland and new home? I cannot speak for the Indigenous population. Though, I acknowledge their struggles regarding their identities that expects First Nations to be caricatures of themselves.…

    • 1461 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Currently Canada is known as a bilingual and multicultural country. Our society has made it illegal to discriminate any person with a certain religion, their mother language, gender, etc. But unfortunately in the previous years, starting 1913’s Anglophone and Francophone were not great neighbours as in today. There are multiple events that have changed the two relations. At the beginning of 1830’s the employment in Quebec was not fair so the confederation was formed with John A Macdonald and George-Ethienne.…

    • 1243 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Canada played a role in the Vietnam conflict as a member of the International Control Commission, they also had a significant contribution of war materials to the United States. The Prime Minister of Canada publicly maintained that he was against the war, but some of his actions suggest that pressure from Washington was affecting his decisions. While some took to the streets in protest, Canada took thousands of draft resistors into the country and thousands of Canadians volunteered to fight with the US military. Upon researching the public opinion during the war it is apparent that; the public opinion of Canadians during the Vietnam conflict was divided across a vast spectrum of opinion and interest and to draw a generalized linear conclusion…

    • 2038 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    This caused this area of Canadians to have mixed feelings about their loyalty. This made to where it would take a small militia to outnumber the armed forces of “Canada.” Whenever Americans troops went in and displayed that the Canadians’ former loyalty to America wouldn’t protect them from the burning and pillaging of homes and farms. These former Americans would still only fight if they knew the British showed they would be in defense of…

    • 929 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Explanation: This shows that Canada was being negligent towards its own people, and the Canadian government was not trying to help the soldiers recover from a violent battle or bring peace to their families and other Canadian citizens. Transitional Word/Phrase #2: Secondly, Point #2: Québécois and English Canadians were never at peace in the past. Proof #2: In 1963, there was a separatist movement in Canada, and they were called the FLQ (Front de Liberation du Quebec) : Whose goal was to liberate the Quebec citizens from the English power, their motto was “Independence or death”. Citation/Footnote #2: "CBC.ca - Canadian News Sports Entertainment Kids Docs Radio TV." CBCnews Quiet Movement.…

    • 1562 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Euthanasia In Canada

    • 1358 Words
    • 6 Pages

    What positive or negative impacts could the regulation of Euthanasia in Canada cause? Euthanasia is the intentional killing of someone in order to relieve ones pain or suffering. The legalization of Euthanasia has been a heavily debated topic in Canada for numerous years with various cases and point of views, leading to the current laws on euthanasia in Canada. It is an important matter that needs to be examined carefully as it relates to the value of people’s lives. The legalization of the practice of euthanasia has many negative affects as it goes against many doctors’ beliefs, degrades the value of human life that Canadian law protects, and will possibly be abused by both doctors and patients.…

    • 1358 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Settlement In Canada

    • 759 Words
    • 4 Pages

    The most apparent barrier preventing settlement was to gathering people to go in the first place. People who understood the harshness of leaving home for unknown lands, thought twice about making choices regarding recruitment. The Iroquois’ “threat of murderous incursions that had alarmed colonists” (Moogk 487), death can be a big deterrent. If getting people to go to Canada was not a big enough issue in the first place, preventing workers from returning home proved to be an even greater feat. Familial issues played a key role in whether or not an engagés returned to France or not.…

    • 759 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Assimilation, as shown through the events in Up Ghost River, is the underlying factor that creates an environment where an imbalance between cultures is accepted and allowed in Canada. Native peoples are generally thought of as the subject of assimilation, however they also play a role in creating a gap between non-native Canadians and themselves. Native people have been pushed down in their resistance to stop assimilation for so long that it has come to the point where they either must submit and change their culture or live a life of poverty. Anything they try and do to break out of this cycle generally ends in the same way:“Any resistance is met with the threat of arrest by the police. Your not sure where your children are going….You’re…

    • 1065 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays

Related Topics