Methicillin Case Study

Superior Essays
Impact of penicillin, novobiocin, and kanamycin on Staphylococcus aureus bacterial growth

Introduction:
In today’s world, bacteria are becoming more abundant and strong in terms of their resistance to antibiotics. As a result of increasing prescription potency, clinicians are supposed to be conscious of those patients who are more inclined to infection by prescribing the appropriate antibiotics on the basis of their sensitivities along with their cultures (Fleming et al., 2006). A recent case study by Fleming and his colleagues showed the presence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureas (MRSA), a strain of Staphylococcus aureas that has relatively strong antibiotic resistance as a result of natural selection. Accordingly, they found
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Figure 3: Total magnification of 1000X of the Gram-positive S. aureus Antibiotic Penicillin Novobiocin Kanamycin Control
Zones of Inhibition (cm) Sample 1 3.5 2.3 1.5 0 Sample 2 3.5 2.5 1.5 0 Sample 3 3.0 2.1 1.7 0 Sample 4 3.6 2.5 1.5 0 Average 3.4 2.3 1.6 0 Standard Deviation 0.271 0.163 0.153 0 Table 1: Displays the multiple samples conducted, along with the corresponding zones of inhibition diameters, in centimeters, for each antibiotic disk. Furthermore, the average diameter for each antibiotic’s inhibition zone was calculated in addition to the standard deviation for each disk.

Discussion and
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The results acquired in this experiment confidently represent the idea that different antibiotics have various impacts upon the inhibition of a particular bacterium. Further studies can be conducted in which we analyze the components of certain antibiotics and what makes them more effective than others. Additionally, one can conduct multiple trials of antibiotics interacting with several strains of the same bacteria, in order to obtain more thorough data.

References:
General Biology Labrotary Manual. (2014). Lab Topic 5: Bacteria, Pearson Learning Solutions, Boston, MA. 79-91

Fleming, S., Brown, L., & Tice, S. (2006). Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus skin infections: Report of a local outbreak and implications for emergency department care. Journal of the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners, Volume 18(Issue 6), 297-300.

Juayang, A., B. de los Reyes,, G., De la Rama, A., & Gallega, C. (2014). Antibiotic Resistance Profiling of Staphylococcus aureus Isolated from Clinical Specimens in a Tertiary Hospital from 2010 to 2012.

Spanu, V., Scarano, C., Cossu, F., Pala, C., Spanu, C., & P. L. De Santis, E. (2014). Antibiotic Resistance Traits and Molecular Subtyping of Staphylococcus aureus Isolated from Raw Sheep Milk Cheese. Journal of Food Science, M2066 –

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