Penalization In Julius Caesar

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Throughout history, lords and monarchs have been infamous for their inextinguishable eagerness for power and complete domination; the induce of outright sovereignty and complete obligation was too intriguing to disdain. This domination can lead to volatile and destructive visions of the world collapsing into pieces. It is in the hands of the ruler to restrict that from ever happening. In the play, Julius Caesar, by William Shakespeare, Caesar had vivid imaginations to have supremacy over Rome; also doing whatever it takes to win over the hearts of the citizens in Rome. In turn, a group of conspirators conceived out a plot to assassinate Julius Caesar so this would never have happened. Caesar should have been penalized for his actions because …show more content…
But they never think about how power can affect people. For instance, Julius Caesar. Caesar had only wanted to influence his power for his own personal reasons. In the text it states,”“And it is very much lamented, that you have no such mirrors as will turn, your hidden worthiness into your eye; that you might see your shadow,” meaning that once Caesar’s plan is successful of attaining the power of Rome, he will then come out of the shadows and then show his true colors to the people of Rome (Act I ii 55-59). Clearly, if a person has such intentions of ruling, then they are simply not worthy of such a …show more content…
All of this maybe true, however, can taking over Rome and ruling the world be morally justified reasoning for love and attraction. Having followers and having people trust you is a good thing, but it’s not good when they are on your side for any step that you take. For instance, during Antony’s speech, when he tries to get the people of Rome to kill the conspirators for their wrong-doings. But before they even could, the conspirators had already fled from Rome. Furthermore, they had killed Cinna the poet because he had a name similar to the name of one of the conspirators who had killed Caesar; Cinna. In the text it states,” O, what a fall was there, my countrymen! Then I, and you, and all of us fell down, Whilst bloody treason flourish 'd over us. O, now you weep; and, I perceive, you feel the dint of pity: these are gracious drops. Kind souls, what, weep you when you but behold our Caesar 's vesture wounded? Look you here, here is himself, marr 'd, as you see, with traitors,” meaning that the crowd was on Brutus’s side at first but then slowly switched to the other side because they thought it was right when what the conspirators had done to save Rome was more reasonable. Undoubtedly, Caesar had been killed for a justified reason but the conspirators should have approached things in another way to make

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