Global Art Cinema

2050 Words 9 Pages
Global art cinema has been a widely contested term among film critics and scholars alike. The term was created to help categorize and define a genre of film that directly opposes First Cinema, or commercial cinema produced and distributed by Hollywood in the United States. In the book, Global Art Cinema, Second Cinema, or art cinema, has been summarized by authors Rosalind Galt and Karl Schoonover, as being feature films typically including “...foreign production, overt engagement of aesthetic...or excessive in its visual style, use of color, or characterization (2010, p.6).” Films branded as art cinema are often marketed to audiences and film festivals in reference to an auteurist director with recognizable stylization and aesthetics. In addition …show more content…
Widely regarded as an acclaimed auteurist filmmaker, Almodovar’s creative vision is foregrounded in all of the films he has directed, written, or produced. Frequent motifs such as, female protagonists, bold colors, inventive camera angles, and elaborate decor and fashion have become synonymous with his auteurism. His reliance on striking colors — usually a purposeful combination of reds, oranges, yellows, blues, and greens — often dictate the emotion of the film. The book, All About Almodovar: A Passion for Cinema, edited by Bradley Epps and Despina Kakoudaki deeply discusses Almodovar’s auteurism. “Matador (1986), for instance draws heavily on the reds and golden yellows of the Spanish flag, in keeping with the bullfighting theme that is at its center…(2009).” Color remains a dominant element of his auteurism, and places prominence on Spanish culture. Matador tells the story of retired bullfighter turned teacher, Diego Montez and his student Angel (Antonio Banderas). Angel, in an effort to lose his virginity attempts to rape Diego’s girlfriend but fails. The film confronts murder, mutilation, suicide and rape, but the cinematography and color palettes make it difficult for audiences to view the film as anything but visually …show more content…
His 2009 melodrama, Broken Embraces, is set in modern Madrid, Spain and frequently shifts back and forth between 1992 and the present time (2008). Broken Embraces stars Penelope Cruz as Lena, a former prostitute and mistress of a wealthy business man. In a vain attempt to break free of her manipulative relationship with the business man, she decides to pursue a career in acting, and auditions to be in Girls and Suitcases — the fictional comedy that exists within Broken Embraces. After Lena lands the part, her controlling lover offers to finance the film as a way to keep a watchful eye over her as she works. Lena’s lover also employs his homosexual, socially inept, son to keep tabs on Lena’s whereabouts through the making of a behind-the-scenes documentary. Eventually, the director of Girls and Suitcases, Mateo Blanco, and Lena fall in love. Their affair creates complications and Lena’s lover begins physically abusing her, striving to regain any control he may still have over the situation. Thematically, Broken Embraces explores repression, prostitution, homosexulity, and drugs. The scenes taking place in the 1990’s are far more provocative than anything taking place in 2008, reflecting the political state of Spain at that time. Almodovar’s Broken Embraces represents Spanish national identity in a way that directly opposes Franco’s dictatorship.

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