Merchant Marine Prowess

954 Words 4 Pages
The American Navy and Merchant Marine both possess a longstanding history of prowess showcased by their perseverance through the changing times, adapting to the trials of advancement as a ship would adapt to the changing of the tides. The further advancement of technology during the 19th and 20th Centuries brought about a shift in the maritime and wartime industries, gone were the looming hulls of vast wooden ships to be replaced by the thick, steel riveted hulls of naval battleships, carriers, and cruisers galore. The merchant marine once more patrolled the sea alongside the Navy in defending her country and its efforts. The military aircraft carriers that developed in the 20th Century, perhaps, were the source of one of the largest changes …show more content…
The American fleet, through carefully executed strategy, defeated the previously “invincible” Japanese Fleet in a display of military prowess that could only be accomplished through the superb leadership and experience of the United States Commanders, Admiral Chester Nimitz, Rear Admiral Raymond Spruance, and Rear Admiral Frank Jack Fletcher. Their leadership coupled with their men’s faith and familiarity in the available sea and aircrafts, despite the superiority of the aircrafts of the Japanese adversaries, as well as having won the favor of lady luck. While the attack on Pearl Harbor may have opened the curtain on the Pacific Theater, the Battle of Midway set the stage for an American victory over the Land of the Rising …show more content…
Following the mass destruction of the attack on Pearl Harbor, a team of cryptanalyst or code breakers, working right at Pearl Harbor diligently set about working to penetrate and decode the messages broadcast on Japanese radio signals. Under the watchful eye of Lieutenant Commander Joseph J. Rochefort, the Americans managed to decode messages essential to their future victory at the Battle of Midway. These messages revealed that “[the Japanese] were about to launch an even bigger operation, one involving most of their fleet… [in an] attack that would take place in early June… [targeting] the tiny atoll of Midway” (Symonds 205). Such knowledge and future knowledge that was ascertained through this and other such future broadcast messages informed the American fleet of the movements and intentions of their foes, ultimately allowing them to not only prepare for the assault in advance, but also allotting them the advantage of the element of surprise, for they now knew what their foe intended to do while their own intentions remained

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