Pausania's Argument Common And Celestial

Decent Essays
According to Pausanias’s argument Common and Celestial are distinct forms of Love, the latter being higher, more intelligible and honorable form of love. Pausanias identifies Common Love as less worthy of praise and he dedicates his speech towards praising Celestial Love and explaining what is honorable and what is not. He contrasts ‘good’ and ‘bad’ forms of Love regardless of which since neither God can be wrong. Pausanias mentions societal rules affect the forms of love present in places such as the Persian Empire and in Athens and argues that societies where tyrants rule and where Love in its entirety is not present are also lacking in education and sports. He mentions how it is honorable to yield oneself to a lover for the sake of virtue …show more content…
Pausanias identifies Common Love as less worthy of praise and he dedicates his speech towards praising Celestial Love and explaining what is honorable and what is not. He contrasts ‘good’ and ‘bad’ forms of Love regardless of which since neither God can be wrong. Pausanias mentions societal rules affect the forms of love present in places such as the Persian Empire and in Athens and argues that societies where tyrants rule and where Love in its entirety is not present are also lacking in education and sports. He mentions how it is honorable to yield oneself to a lover for the sake of virtue and making oneself …show more content…
He suggests “… among men who are sexually attracted towards boys: only some are motivated by the pure form of Celestial Love” (181d) that further supports the argument these men who are primarily focused on the boys’ bodies with ripe intelligence are performing bad love as Celestial Love is “conducted badly” (183d). The physical attractiveness of a person is to fade with years and it is the mind and/or the soul which matter is practicing good Love. Common Love which is practiced between man and boys is also being practiced by women, but it is not looked down upon if conducted properly. Gratifying a lover both mentally and physically in these circumstances seems to be praised and deception of love is strongly condemned by

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