Paul's Case A Study In Temperament Analysis

Great Essays
Willa Cather 's compelling literary work, "Paul 's Case: A Study in Temperament", presents a troubled soul, Paul, who suffers from a decline in the nurture of his environment. Paul 's determination presents itself in a standoffish, rebellious manner as he goes against the conformity of life in the humdrum neighborhood of Pittsburgh, where he resides. The study of Paul 's temperament digs deep into the psyche and depicts how an inimical social atmosphere can deteriorate the human mind. Charlotte Perkins Gilman 's, "The Yellow Wallpaper", is a cynical tale compiled from a collection of journal entries in which, a woman suffering from manic depression catalogs her descent into madness, and probable suicide. The woman presents herself as a naive …show more content…
Comparable to, "The Yellow Wallpaper", Paul finds himself falling apart under the wrath of his surroundings. His demeanor is present during a heated discussion with his teachers, of whether or not to readmit him into the learning institution for repetitive misconduct. Smug at heart, Paul conceals his emotions from the people of authority before him with a little help from a red carnation, tucked neatly into his buttonhole. There is something vindictive about Paul 's overall behavior; "There is something wrong about the fellow" (Cain, Cather 372), his drawing master states to the group after Paul 's exit. Light-hearted and rebellious, complimented with a set of nerves, Paul hustles to Carnegie Music Hall where he can express his true self. The arts provide Paul with the necessary escape from the confinement of his neighborhood in Pittsburgh, and the overbearing suffocation of judgements from his father. While going about his everyday life on Cordelia Street, Paul meticulously conjures up a plan to live the "high life" of a New York City elite, free from a force created life that comes from his father 's decisions. Paul 's youthful and daring mind leaves him in a pickle after committing a "white-collar" crime. Defiant as ever, he uses stolen company money for a new wardrobe, and of course, fresh flowers; …show more content…
John. Burdened by post pardon, the woman is being held against her will by John 's faulty diagnosis of "nervous depression disorder". The diagnosis leads to an overbearing "rest cure" that eats the woman 's brain bit by bit. Shackled in an upstairs room, the woman documents her inner thoughts of her struggles and her husband, in a journal that must be hidden. Literature and writing are what makes the woman happy, but her husband deems it as exhausting and detrimental to her overall health and sanity; strictly rest means being tied to a bedpost in his eyes. Spending countless days and nights with no change in scenery would drive anyone mad. As the walls come alive, the woman 's mind enters into a phenomenon of deception. Continually admiring the section of yellow wallpaper that stands before her in utter disgust, the woman 's mind begins to make connections between fantasy and reality. As the patterns and shapes dance before her, a woman behind bars emerges; "The front pattern does move-and no wonder! The woman behind shakes it" (Cain, Gilman 218); such peculiarity that is tied into that very statement! The corruption of solitary confinement encourages the woman to fall into a pit of utter insanity, as she tries to save the woman trapped within the walls. Mad circumstances lead to anomalous outcomes: a deteriorated brain, a

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