Paul Simon Graceland Controversy Analysis

Improved Essays
I have never been a fan of Paul Simon’s music. However, the best song off his Graceland album would be, “You Can Call Me Al.” The song has a memorable tune where I can “bob” my head to it. The song holds meaning. It is about becoming aware of your surroundings, which I can easily associate myself with. I have always been drawn to lyrics that make me self-aware.

The Paul Simon Graceland Controversy was about how Paul Simon was going against the apartheid boycott. However, in his mind, he was still protesting against apartheid because he hired black musicians or artist to perform with him. The people of South Africa did not see it that way. The only way a boycott works is by having everyone boycott. Even if that means, breaking all ties with
…show more content…
I think it serves as a lesson to remind us of the wrongdoings we have committed in the past. It makes you feel that you were a part of it, which helps with the healing process. The question asks if the TRC dispensed justice? It depends on how one would define justice. If justice is defined as retributive then no, it was not served. I feel that if I were an individual who lived during the time of apartheid, I would want the perpetrators to be punished for what they did to my family, my friends and to me, but that would bring satisfaction for only me not for others. Justice is served for everybody or for nobody. However, if justice is defined as restorative, then it was dispensed because humanity could be seen working interpersonally instead of one group overruling the other. It ended apartheid and that is what matters most. I think Bishop Tutu’s arguments for Restorative Justice and the TRC was convincing because if we do not forgive others, then we let the past dictate our future and that can lead to a life of destruction. One of my favorite quotes from the Lion King reflects this situation, “The past can hurt. But […] you can either run from it or learn from …show more content…
Retributive Justice inflicts punishment on the wrongdoers. Ubuntu means, in the simplest terms, humanity to others. We are humans through other humans and we cannot become humans alone. Our humanity is to assists one another, when an individual’s humanity is enhanced another’s is enhanced as well. Bishop Tutu says that we cannot become fully human without Ubuntu. Anything that has a negative impact on the good in our lives holds us as prisoners and no one would be able to move on. Therefore, Bishop Tutu says that accepting the concept of Restorative Justice is the only means of restoring relationships since humans need

Related Documents

  • Superior Essays

    The flaw in this method is that it gives too much attention to the people who were behind injustice. Also, it asks the victims to sympathize with their oppressors for causing their suffering. This idea of forgiveness wanted the victims to ignore their pain and loss to ensure a better future. Moreover, Tutu stated that “...to forgive is the best form of self-interest since anger, resentment, and revenge are corrosive of the summum bonum, that greatest good, communal harmony that enhances the humanity and personhood of all in the community” (35). Certainly, to live the good life people should focus on forgiveness instead of negative emotions, such as anger and revenge, however, there is no justice if the oppressors are giving nothing in return.…

    • 1326 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Great Essays

    Violent Accounts Summary

    • 1638 Words
    • 7 Pages

    This shows that while connected, these definitions of forgiveness and reconciliation do remain parted. Due to this dichotomy, a separate definition for reconciliation has to be introduced. Page 115 emphasizes that the term ‘reconciliation’ is synonymous to the phrase ‘negotiated forgiveness.’ Negotiated forgiveness is the act of actual, “dialogue between the perpetrator and the victim, with the perpetrator disclosing the crimes and taking responsibility, and the victim …trying to understand the perpetrator’s world” (115). It is a clash of two minds where the end goal is a homogenous solution and an understanding of one another. It is for the victim to see as the perpetrator saw and for the wrongdoer to grasp the effect they…

    • 1638 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    I may be cold about my decision, but I would not be able to look that boy in the face and honestly say I forgave him. I would not forgive him about the innocent lives he took, even if it wasn’t by his gun. Wearing the SS uniform and turning his back on the teachings that he received as a child are enough to make him guilty. He might not have killed anyone, but by going along with the Hitler Youth and the SS made him just like the ones who did inflict the horrific pain on innocent people. Forgiveness is excusing a fault or offense.…

    • 769 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    To be able to see the conception of humanity that emerges optimistic, it is important to be accepting of the choices you and others have made. The lack of acceptance for choices made will result in a negative approach of human race. Every single man will see the humanity differently, but it will be based on their own choices. Freedom of will is an opportunity and a blessing, in my perspective it the greatest blessing ever given to mankind. Humans have the right to change, create, destroy and destruct.…

    • 736 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    This in a sense shows how guilt attributes to our sense of morality. According to society, those guilty deserve some sort of negative attitude, condemnation, and have set themselves apart from the community because of their failure to commit to communal norms. When labeling a person guilty, we transform their status and “believe that we are entitled to take from the guilty something they owe”. They are subject to punishment which we believe provides compensation and constitutes the criminal paying back his debt. These attitudes and conditions applied to the guilty show our belief in an established order of things, belief that imbalance of the order is caused by the guilty, and belief that individuals can be together and apart determined by people 's willingness to comply to the norms and beliefs of the community.…

    • 736 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    They will feel humiliated and will act out by blaming others. She believes instead of shame punishment, they should do community services which is better for them and the community. It won’t make the people feel horrible about themselves. In Dan Kahan’s essay, he believes that shame punishment is much cheaper than incarceration and that it will be less embarrassing than community service and jail. There are many ways on finding alternatives to incarcerations for nonviolent crimes but I disagree because a person receiving shame punishment won’t help them change their behavior and will negatively affect future decisions.…

    • 1518 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    There should be consequences and repercussion for all actions rather right or wrong. In this case, doing wrong should not be rewarded, but punished and a lesson learning. Meanwhile, embrace those that do right and encourage them to continue on in a positive manner. Galatians 6:9 New Living Translation (NLT) suggest, “So let’s not get tired of doing what is good. At just the right time we will reap a harvest of blessing if we don’t give up.” After all punitive damages “have no legitimate place in contract law because they are, penalties and a breach of contract,” said by Roger Miller.…

    • 735 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Question 4 1969 was a time where African American musicians and political organizations were fighting against the war on Black America. For example, James Brown and Sly and the Family Stone both stood up for African American rights and equality, but took very different approaches to their music and message. Political organizations also took a similar approach to black liberation. For instance, there were militant groups like The Black Panthers and nonviolent advocacy groups like the Student National Coordinating Committee (SNCC). During this time having a spectrum of opinions and approaches to ending racism was essential because it gave anyone who was willing to join the fight someone to look up to and gain strength from.…

    • 737 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Conceivably, if he had taken responsibility of his actions and endured the punishment adequate to his crime he could have been a hero. Readers learn Dimmesdale punishes himself in chapter ten, “ While thus suffering under bodily disease and gnawed an tortured by some black trouble of the soul”, but not to the extent of Hester’s punishment. (Hawthorne 117). He may be a minister but his title should be another incentive to come forward. Dimmesdale could lose his job and reputation, but technically so did Hester.…

    • 818 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    It gives humanity a goal and something to strive towards, so even if a cosmopolitan failed in eradicating all pain, they could be satisfied that they used their time “to decrease world suck” as the Vlogbrothers, John and Hank Green, would say. The worst thing anyone could say about cosmopolitanism in practice is that they tried too hard to make the world a better place and they believed too hard in the goodness of humanity. So if the worst one can say about a moral practice is they tried to get rid of human suffering for everyone and they only succeeded in helping a few, then is it really so bad? Would one object to having their…

    • 1399 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Great Essays