Parkinson Disease History

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History
Parkinson disease was coined by James Parkinson, an English apothecary surgeon, political an activist, paleontologist and geologist in 1817. He described the disease as a shaking palsy that involves resting tremor, diminished muscles strength, paralysis, unusual posture and gait, and how it progresses overtime. Sixty years later, Jean Martin Charcot, a French neurologist and professor of anatomical pathology, also the founder of modern neurology. He clearly defined the disease as a slow progressive disease of the central nervous system that leads to motor impairment. It involves extensive degenerative changes in the basal ganglia which has a role in movement. As well as the loss of or decrease in levels of dopamine in the basal ganglia. Parkinson disease involves the lack of dopamine
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The cause of Parkinson is unknown, however evidence suggests that both genetics and environment factor may play a role. There are no standard diagnostic tests for Parkinson’s disease. However, the physician design neurological test for persons with PD to examine the presence of tremor, stiffness, and slow movement. It is estimated that approximately 1-2% of the U.S population about 1.5 million mostly older adults over the age of 60 is affected. The beginning onset of Parkinson is around age 40 and the onset is at 60 years old. It is more prevalent in older male than women. Occupational therapists play a value role in individuals with Parkinson’s disease whose daily functioning is compromised. The goal of occupational therapists is to evaluate and designed appropriate interventions to enhance the lives of individuals with Parkinson’s disease. Example of one activity an OT would do with a client with this diagnosis: individuals with Parkinson’s disease have limited fine motor coordination that leads to difficulty fastening buttons, pulling zipper, and tying shoe. However, hand exercise such as hand bike, thera-putty, and thera-band helps strengthen and coordinate

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