Parental Involvement in Reading: Effect on Early Reading Achievement

3475 Words Feb 17th, 2012 14 Pages
Parental Involvement in Reading:
Effect on Early Reading Achievement
Reading achievement is one of the most important aspects in every young child’s life. Learning to read is of course anything but a race, but getting a good start is as vital in learning to read as it is in any race. Children who fall behind in school at an early age seldom catch up. Studies have found that children who were classified as poor readers at the end of first grade had an 88% chance of being poor readers at the end of fourth grade (Jenkins & Vadasy, 2000). Countless studies have been conducted to determine the effect of parental involvement on students reading achievement. Observations and interviews suggested that parental activity increased
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With such unstable family conditions, teachers are challenged, then, to help parents consider activities which have the utmost value in preparing children for achievement in reading. Numerous studies have been conducted to determine whether parents reading to children have a beneficial effect on their children’s reading success (Anglum). To determine the degree to which parental involvement has an effect on children’s early reading achievement, correlational and experimental literature will be reviewed. “A child’s success in school literacy programs often depends on the experiences he or she has at home; consequently, there have been many efforts to understand powerful home-school literacy connections” (Morrow, 1997, p. 736). Anglum (1990), Debaryshe (1993), Dunn (1981), Fritjers (2000) and Vivas (1996) conducted studies to determine the effect of parental involvement on student reading achievement. All of these studies found that reading aloud to children has a positive effect on a child’s comprehension and verbal skills. Anglum, Debaryshe, Dunn, and Fritjers are correlational studies in which questionnaires and assessments were used to evaluate the effects of parents reading to children. The questionnaires covered some broad questions that yielded social information about the subject and the family of the subject. This “diary information”

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