Parent-Child Interaction Therapy Case Study

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Children with Oppositional Defiant Disorder tend to have disorderly behavior that makes it difficult for the parent and child to interact in an affective manner. Parent-Child Interaction Therapy, also known as PCIT, is a behavior program developed by Sheila Eyberg and other contributors. The purpose of PCIT is to decrease disruptive behaviors while increasing the parent-child relationship through interactions between parent and child (Nieter, Thornberry, & Brestan-Knight, 2013). PCIT is broken down into two components which include Child Directed Interaction (CDI) and Parent Directed Interaction (PDI). The CDI portion lets the child take control during play which is designed to increase the relationship between parent and child with praise and reflection (Nieter et al., 2013). While during the PDI portion, the parent is shown and guided effective ways to discipline the child.
According to Monette, Sullivan, and DeJong (2011), “The term human services refers to activities with the primary goal of enhancing the relationship between people and societal institutions so that people may maximize their potential and alleviate distress.” This study relates to family studies because
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There are six ethical issues when working with social research which include informed consent, deception, privacy, physical or mental distress, problems in sponsored research, scientific misconduct or fraud and scientific advocacy (Monette et al.,2011). The participants knew that this study or program was made available to them and gave permission to researchers for participation, no names or payments were given. In this research, some would say that the families referred by CPS could be considered vulnerable. However, the families were aware of the study and gave consent. Also no information was withheld from any participants. Lastly, this research study was approved by the IRB, making this study ethically

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