Pamela Or Virtue Rewarded Analysis

Decent Essays
Pamela: Or Virtue Rewarded is not at all a love story. A love story is filled with romantic elements displayed by both sides usually accompanied with a rival or issue which holds them apart, a story filled with adoration and bliss, and less of an overwhelming conflict between the two parties. Pamela instead is more of a social commentary on the 18th century cultural and societal strata because of the story focusing very much on her desire to maintain her virtue at the hands of a corrupting force and the social boundaries that Mr. B violates or attempts to break, at the very least. Pamela’s conflict with Mr. B demonstrates the need for the preservation of the self through her one true valuable asset in her virtue, which empowers her by emphasizing …show more content…
Therefore, the attraction she feels towards Mr. B at the end of Volume I stems from a twisted form of attachment that she has to Mr. B after having grown accustomed to over a long period of time to his abusive affections in a form of Stockholm syndrome.
The romantic aspects of Pamela are sorely lacking in every aspect as Pamela seems reluctant to reciprocate Mr. B’s affections and suffer immensely at the hands of his abuse according to her own account to her parents. Mr. B’s initial obsession with Pamela borders psychotic as he goes so far as to steal the letters she sends to her parents. Pamela recalls in Letter X “I have not been idle; but had writ from time to time, how he, by sly mean degrees, exposed his wicked views; but somebody stole my letter, and I know not what has become of it… I fear, he that was mean enough to do bad things… but be it as it will, all
…show more content…
The marginalization of the self Pamela experiences at the hands of Mr. B results in the story becoming heavily focused on an unhealthy attachment and lustful one-sided relationship from Mr. B towards Pamela. He not only attempts to contaminate her body, but also seeks to envelope her entire mind and rational thought as her letters evidently become more and more focused on her desire to maintain her virtuosity, perhaps in an attempt to dissuade Mr. B should he intercept future letters. Pamela recalls, “I have been scared out of my senses; for just now, as I was folding up this letter in my late lady’s dressing-room, in comes young master… I went to hide the letter in my bosom… O how ashamed I was!” (119). Pamela clearly embarrassed that Mr. B would intrude upon her most intimate moments where she is trying to process the death of her former employer. Her complacent behavior she outwardly displays towards Mr. B in the initial encounter seemingly placates him in turn as he compliments her and encourages her to “be faithful and diligent”, although she could not display her horror publicly to him due to the social strata (119). His intrusions into her letters force her to acknowledge his feelings of lust for her, while she attempts to keep her mind clear of tainted thoughts. Mr. B’s

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    One last aspect of their uniqueness in their love is the paradoxes that describe their love. Catherine does not like Heathcliffe, but she loves him. She hates his character yet she loves him because she feels that they are the same person and that he is more her than she is (Cecil 303). Catherine does not care how she makes Heathcliffe feel, but says she has felt his emotions from the beginning (Cecil 304). Catherine and Heathcliffe 's relationship is based on passion, yet not obsessive passion, but the…

    • 1172 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    This is particularly clear in how others treated Tesman and Lovborg negatively due to their weaknesses. Characters in the play don’t seem to respect Tesman; his wife least of all. Hedda says, to Tesman’s face and in front of his aunt, that she “really [doesn’t] care” about what he has to say, yet Tesman continues to follow her around (Ibsen). Brack, who seems to be his closest friend, holds Tesman’s financials over him and explicitly pursues an affair with his wife. Others treat Tesman this way because they know they can get away with it without having to worry about his retaliation.…

    • 1172 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Evidence of this is present within the quotation ‘In sadness, cousin, I do love a woman’ when Romeo refers to her using not a name, but gender. This shows he is a courtly lover through the connotation of his lover being nothing more than of a sex, and thus that being the only important thing about them. Through surrounding this sexism with upset toning, Shakespeare degrades it; supporting his ideology of true love and its regarding to each of its lovers as equal in contrast. Due to this, the implication arises that there is no need for us to know her name; she is not real almost, as his love for her is not either. Therefore, he is not convincing Benvolio, but himself that it is meant to be, even though the dramatic irony states that the reader knows it is not, as told in the prologue.…

    • 1114 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    In Washington Square, Catherine, a daughter neglected and looked down upon by her father falls in love with Morris Townsend. Townsend is more interested in Catherine inheritance than Catherine herself, yet he pretends that he is in love with Catherine. Ultimately, this hurts Catherine when she discovers the truth behind Townsend 's affection, it hurts Townsend himself, for he does not marry Catherine, nor does he receive her inheritance. Finally, it hurts Dr. Sloper who is Catherine father because he dies expecting Catherine to betray him after his death. Much like Bruce himself and his family are hurt because they must partake in living his lie, so are Henry James ' characters hurt by Morris Townsend 's lie.…

    • 783 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    That Long Silence Analysis

    • 1475 Words
    • 6 Pages

    Deshpande points out the women in most cases have no freedom in choosing their own partners. Her The Dark Holds No Terrors told mainly in the first person narrative. The protagonist Sarita who attempts to free herself deals with the traumatic experience. She becomes the victim of exploitation by her own husband only because he is not ready to tolerate her as a popular and doctor wife’s superiority but Saru tolerates her husband’s torture, trouble and turmoil with herself with a sense of confidence but feels bad and disgusting inside. Manu, being a lecturer at the third grade college, creates great discomfort for her.…

    • 1475 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Previously shown, sexual repression has caused characters to seek satisfaction in others’ sexual attention, but in Elizabeth’s case we see her sexual repression has caused her to draw away from her husband, thinking that she is not good enough for him. This act of not being a just wife during this time is committing a sin. During the play, Elizabeth declares, “It were a cold house I kept” (Miller 137). The cold house represents the tension that is created in the Proctor household. Elizabeth’s sexual repression has predominantly constructed sexual strain between John and herself as well as establishing a victim out of herself as a result of pulling herself away from her husband.…

    • 986 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The emergence of male insecurity in both novels derives from the overpowering amount of female control. Harding and Billy Bibbit both portray the effects of an insecure male, caused by the destructiveness of Ratched, in Kesey’s novel. Under the belief that he cannot sexually satisfy his wife, Harding enrolled himself into the institution. Ratched uses his weakness against him through her constant questioning of his marriage which leads Harding to strengthen his belief, since he perceives Ratched as a “genius” (Kesey 64). Additionally, his wife’s promiscuous nature helps cement his insecurities as it leads him to believe that she is not sexually satisfied, evident when she “[blew] the black boy a kiss...slinging her hips forward” (33) and when…

    • 701 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    It aids in providing context and shows the prejudice present at the time. There is one line of dialogue in this sonnet and it is ‘What a big book for such a little head’. This line appears to be coming from her husband, who ridicules her attempts to be educated. He is portrayed as being sexist and having the power in the relationship, not only because he is a man but because Milley’s character is in love with him, making it hard for her to leave. The reader can also tell, however, that she is frustrated and silently irate with him due to his lack of support.…

    • 1284 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The sight of such a young couple who also suffer from the malady of marriage has only greater impact on Mr. Kapasi‘s grasp of his own miserable and ill relationship and his inability to cure it. Also, reader can see Mr. and Mrs. Das‘s marriage is their different expectations of life, which result in Mrs. Das‘s repression of desire. The symbols of repressed desire accompanies Mrs. Das through her marriage and has its roots in the born of her children, when she had to abandon her former friends and life. Mrs. Das‘s dissatisfaction with her life and her feelings of constant distaste are the main symptoms in already spreading malady of her marriage. Wife‘s repression of desire is visible throughout her behavior, such as treatment of the children, ignorance and indifference to her husband, but the main repression of her needs is revealed by her confession to Mr. Kapasi.…

    • 1243 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Greed In The Great Gatsby

    • 1041 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Her love for Tom persists, which causes her to not like her husband because of the luxury he is unable to provide for her. Myrtle maliciously talked about Mr. Wilson as a “good for nothing” to Tom when recalling how “he could not even buy his own suit” (50). Being involved with Tom feeds her short-term happiness, but her bitterness is taken out on the poor environment she comes home to and her husband, expecting him to fulfill the materialistic goods he cannot afford. The affair with Tom eventually leads to her death. She rushes in front of the yellow car thinking it is Tom’s wife, Daisy, resulting in Myrtle getting run over by the car (160).…

    • 1041 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays

Related Topics