Palliative Care Model

1316 Words 6 Pages
The realization that illnesses can be cumbersome to contain especially in the event that the patient is approaching the end of their lives is an issue that cannot be understated. In such situations, therefore, there is the need to have in place strategies that will satisfactorily address the problems associated with such life-limiting sickness (Palliative care NSW, 2012). In this direction, therefore, one of the most appropriate ways through which these illnesses can be solved is by employing the palliative care in addressing the problems that such patients and their families may be going through. As such, there is the need to have a better understanding of palliative care and the role that it plays in ensuring that the healthcare wants …show more content…
The major strategies that are used in this care provision model are focused mainly on relieving any forms of suffering on the side of the patients by detecting the illnesses early enough, careful assessment of the illnesses, and applying the most appropriate treatment methodologies in addressing the pain that these patients and their families may be going through. Additionally, this care provision regimen takes into account the physical, psychological and spiritual needs of the patient (Palliative care NSW, 2012). It should be noted however that the palliative care that is suited for an adult cannot be used on a child and vice versa. For this reason therefore, there is the need to develop age-appropriate palliative care that will effectively address the specific needs of a particular patient and their families. An important factor that needs to be taken into consideration is that palliative care goes beyond diagnosis and providing clinical care to the patient and dwells a lot on addressing the individual needs of the patient. The strategies utilized in this care approach are aimed at providing the body with a chance to organize itself in preparation for …show more content…
By nurses being around the terminally-ill patients and constantly giving them words of encouragement, it becomes easier for them to adapt to the conditions that they are being faced with in that particular moment. Such social support is vital in the sense that it assists them to forget about the pain and suffering that they are going through a factor which is tandem with helping them address the psychological pain that they go through. Additionally, sorting their social requirements helps in reducing any feelings of loneliness. Such strategies are provided by social support networks that take into account the cultural needs of the patient. Finally, palliative care is vital in assisting young patients and their family transition peacefully to death by taking care of their spiritual needs. The chaplains that are found in palliative care units play the role of reinforcing the patients’ belief in God that there is a better place waiting for them in the event that they die (Haley & Daley, 2013). Such a realization therefore assists the patients to resolve issues with their acquaintances and relations who are vital in assisting them achieve a sense of spiritual and emotional completion. Furthermore, spirituality during palliative care is crucial in assisting the young patients come to terms with the life changes that have taken place

Related Documents