The Role Of PTSD In War

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War is an armed conflict influenced by opposing states, parties, or nations. And as a result of these events, many people are involved directly in the war and many perish during the struggle to end the war. Though the loss of life is always a terrible result, it is not the only one as a consequence of war. There are those who survived these wars but came back, sometimes sent back, home with not physical injuries but with emotional and mental ones. These psychological injuries were called many things in the past but as time passed, it was called Post Traumatic Stress Disorder or PTSD. Some of the symptoms of PTSD can include anxiety, depression, isolation, disassociation, loss of appetite, and irregular sleep schedules. In the HBO documentary …show more content…
This makes it very difficult for veterans when they come back home and attempt to return back to “living normal.” As Sergeant John Wesley Matthews state, “[t]hey just expect you to turn it off.” When experiencing so much blood shed and even contributing it, some veterans can be driven off the edge because they are unsure of what to do or who to turn to. Sergeant Matthews claims to having thought about suicide before and claiming, “[i]t will tear your life apart. And many a soldier has met an end at his own hand, or at a bottle or something because they didn’t know what to do.” Other cases of extreme PTSD leading up to suicide are the stories of Sergeant Angelo Crapsey and Specialist Noah …show more content…
Take for instance the story of Sergeant First Class William Fraas, where not only he came back but his entire team, whom he was in charge of, made it back home. When Fraas showed a picture of his team, he said that even though everyone came back, “almost everyone here, they have severe PTSD…if they don’t have it, they don’t admit they have it.” Additionally, the effects of PTSD don’t take effect on just the veteran, but their friends and family as well. Fraas’ wife claims that before being deployed, William would spend a lot more time with her and the kids. According to her, Fraas spends most days keeping to himself and spending a lot of time at his computer. In the documentary it can be seen that one of Fraas’ legs is bouncing up and down frantically as he is browsing through the photos of his tours in Iraq, indicating the anxiety received from those memories. She says, “I feel like we’ve been cheated out on so much because he was gone for so long, he’s home but he’s not home like it was.” Also, there was a time when Fraas lost it and almost hit his wife but hit the wall two or three times instead that it created a large open hole in that wall. One other negative effect of his experience in Iraq is the recurring nightmares he has. In an exchange between Fraas and his wife, she asks him why he just woke her up and did nothing else one morning. His response was, “[c]ause I had a nightmare and didn’t know where I was. I was

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