Family Theory: Bowen Family System Model

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Client Identification:
Peter Sheridan is a 46 year old, straight, married male that is employed as an insurance agent for a local insurance company where he once reside. He attended and finished high school and college in the United States of America. His family composition is composed of Thomas, who is 14 and on the report was shown a girl named Miranda or Megan, who is deceased at age of 1 year and 5 months I assumed. He is not the biological father of these two children. Their mother and Peters significant other name is Angela Sheridan. He has a strong belief in his religion where he considers he is Episcopalian.

B. Comprehensive Problem List: Bio-Psycho-Social-Spirit-Cult-Hist Model
Biological:
Outgrown poverty
Left home at age sixteen
…show more content…
Theory: Bowen Family System Theory is based on working with families towards individuals that had a close or separate attachment towards a parent member and then led to unknown anxiety. Within this theory, we must focus entirely on how to assist Peter and have him learn what his role is and how to effectively communicate to Angela and Thomas, or others that associate with him in his day to day life. As stated in the article, step number two called “Unresolved emotional attachment” explains that during this stage the person has a difficult time to work on changing a relationship and their environment without having an increase in anxiety. Therefore, this then has a negative impact on their physical and psychological well being. By looking at Peters interpersonal relationships can see how each form of relationship can then be express how he reacts in different ways. Mainly we need to seek and serve the client (Peter) with full support to better help him. Once we can better serve him during these ways, we can then show teach or show him ways how to communicate to those around him for he can develop a better relationship. Since, it stated that his mother didn’t protect him while the abuse has happened can show that him and mother didn’t have a close connection while growing up. It is truly important for the parent, to care, protect, love and give affection to the child. But since, we aren’t aware of that happening, this can then lead to a child having disorientation towards a parent. In addition, since we aren’t sure whether Peter self harms or not, it can be seen that him dealing with the abuse from Angela could be a form of abuse and harm towards Peter. It doesn’t state if she knows about his past, but if she knows, this can then make him look weak and her the stronger person in the marriage. (MacKay,

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