Analysis Of Our Poor, Our Kids By Anna Quindlen

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Critique of “Our Tired, Our Poor, Our Kids” by Anna Quindlen In the article, “Our Tired, Our Poor, Our Kids” by Anna Quindlen she writes about the homelessness of American children today. Quindlen worked at the New York Post and then at the New York Times. She also won a Pulitzer Prize in 1992. Her many published articles and writing pieces further strengthen her credibility as an author. She has a great deal of experience and this helps readers believe what she writes and readers are more likely to take what she says into account. Quindlen’s effective use of ethos, pathos, and logos allow the reader to get a glimpse into the homeless children problem in America today. Pathos is the most heavily used appeal in Quindlin’s article. Quindlen wants the readers to understand the extent children suffer from living in homeless shelters and very small housing with their single mothers (not all the time but more often than not). Quindlen opens up the article by saying, “Six people live here, in a room the size of the master bedroom in a modest suburban house.” …show more content…
What most middle-class, average Americans have is so much more than the poverty class today. She also uses a similar example in paragraph 3, line 25 “Rosie has three [children]; they share a bathroom down the hall with two other families” as the article continues the author writes, “…children sleep on benches until they are shuffled off dull-eyed for one night in a shelter or motel, only to return…the next day.” They are both very persuasive and emotional statements because the reader can sympathize for these poor children’s conditions and routine. Quindlen wants America to understand that these

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