Ottoman Empire Decline

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The term Ottoman is a dynastic designation which is extracted from Osman I (Arabic: ʿUthmān), who was the nomadic Turkmen leader who instituted both the dynasty and the empire about 1300. Ottoman empire dates back to 15th and 16th centuries, it was established by Turkish Tribes in Anatolia (Asia Minor). It grew as one of the most influential states in the world. The period of Ottoman remained for 600 years and it ended in 1922, when it was substituted by the Turkish Republic and several other successor nations in southeastern Europe and Middle East. When the Ottoman empire was its peak, it had covered most of the regions of southeastern Europe up to the gates of Vienna, present day Hungary, the Balkan region, Greece, and parts of Ukraine; portions …show more content…
However, there were other reasons as, war being the significant. The decline was primarily as a result, of meteoric population increase and the denial to modernize. 17th and 18th centuries proved to be prosperous for the Empire. Therefore, a consequence, the population of Empire doubled. This finally lead to the endemic unemployment and starvation when the economic reserves were unable to sustain such a large population. Also, the capital of the Ottomans was hugely generated because of their incidence on trade routes. The Empire stood across of all the continents and sub-continents, including Europe. Beside, European extension established new routes which surpasses Ottoman territories. Therefore, large amounts of profits began to vanish from the economy (Repp, …show more content…
In the late 1990s the press marked Germany with this term due to its monetary issues, particularly because of the expenses of German reunification after 1990, which were assessed to add up to over €1.5 trillion (explanation of Freie Universität Berlin). It kept on being utilized as a part of the mid 2000s, and as Germany slipped into retreat in 2003. In May 2005, The Economist credited this title to Italy, depicting it as "the genuine sick man of Europe." This alludes to Italy 's auxiliary and political troubles thought to hinder financial changes to relaunch monetary growth. In 2008, The Daily Telegraph additionally utilized the term to portray Italy. The expression "sick man of Europe" was connected to Russia in the book Kremlin Rising: Vladimir Putin 's Russia and the End of Revolution by Peter Baker and Susan Glasser, and by Mark Steyn in his 2006 book America Alone: The End of the World as We Know It. In 2007, The Economist depicted Portugal as "another sick man of Europe" (Shaw & Shaw,

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