Othello Feminist Analysis Essay

1590 Words 6 Pages
In Othello, we have an overflow of male, dominant characters and a deprivation of female ones; so let’s notice and focus on the three women of the play: Desdemona (upper class), Emilia (middle class), and Bianca (lower class). Because she is the daughter of a man with high power, a senator, Desdemona enjoys speaking freely and openly like she does in Act I. In Act I, Desdemona puts up a front with her dad. She acts like the complete opposite of how a woman was expected to in the Venetian times. She challenges this male dominated society. However, due to the great change in her life and location of her home, Desdemona becomes very shut in and allows herself to succumb to the oppression of men (the greater power). She does this all the way, even …show more content…
She goes from this quiet, obedient ‘wife’ of Iago to a headstrong woman, reflecting the Desdemona of Act I. She provides a feminist voice in Othello, as well as, demonstrating a cynical attitude towards men. We see proof of this on page 78, Act III-Scene IV, lines 116-119: “ 'Tis not a year or two shows us a man.They are all but stomachs, and we all but food; They eat us hungerly, and when they are full, They belch us.” Emilia is very aware of her, and other women’s, place underneath men. Men use women to quench their thirsts and to satisfy their “appetites”; once they’ve had enough they just dump the remains. Emilia makes this comment about men because of what is going on with Othello’s attitude towards Desdemona. Emilia’s cynical attitude towards men is even more apparent when she says that men don’t appreciate women once they get what they want, therefore, making them bad because they use …show more content…
Let husbands know their wives have sense like them. They see, and smell, and have their palates both for sweet and sour, as husbands have.” This shows how bold Emilia is because she actually shines light on the unfair rules that apply to women yet not to men, as well as, the lack and need of equality between the sexes. Emilia also believes, as mentioned before, that it is only fair if women get to cheat on their husbands freely without being reprimanded just as men do with their wives. This comes to show, not only how unfit she is for the role of the ideal woman, but also that she shouldn’t have the right to criticize Bianca, the prostitute, like she does. At least Bianca doesn’t hide, or shy away, from the reality of her

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