Orthopedic Surgery: Case Study

Karen: I’m Dr. Karen Sutton, an associate professor at Yale Medicine. Oh, I didn’t add the Department of Orthopedic Surgery. I’m Dr. Karen Sutton, an associate professor in the department of Department of Orthopedic Surgery at Yale Medicine.
0:00:48.9 I’m Dr. Karen Sutton, an associate professor in the Department of Orthopedic Surgery at Yale Medicine.
Interviewer: Describe what ACL is and why it’s so important.
0.01:06.9
Karen: The anterior cruciate ligament, or the ACL, is a ligament that connects the bottom of the thigh bone, or the femur, with the upper part of the shin bone, or the tibia. The ACL helps to stabilize our knee in pivoting and shifting movements. Without the ACL, we would be stumbling all around and could not stabilize our
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0:03:23.0
Karen: So our feet— actually, let me start over. Our female athletes suffer ACL injuries more than our male athletes because of anatomical differences, hormonal differences, and also just the way their knee is pivoting in response to the muscles on the field.
Interviewer: What are the risk factors?
0:03:45.1
Karen: The risk factors for an ACL injury include potential changes in your menstrual cycle. So when you come to the ovulation phase, or the time when the egg is released, the hormones in your body cause the body to be more relaxed. That could lead to an ACL tear. So do you want me to go in different, like, sections, like there’s hormonal reasons, there’s anatomical differences, uh. So you can cut it if you need to, right? Like if —
Interviewer: So the risk factors?
0:04:28.8
Karen: The risk factors for an ACL injury include three fold. One would be hormonal differences. When an athlete is in her ovulation phase of her menstrual cycle, this is when the egg would be released, the body and the ligaments are much more relaxed. This makes them more prone to an ACL
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Parents are always coming up to me asking me what they can do to prevent their daughter from have, having an ACL tear. Unfortunately, there’s not a simple answer to that. One thing I would tell people is it’s actually not the fact that they’re playing sports all the time that causes the ACL injury. It’s the fact that their muscles may not be ready for their sports. I usually advocate to parents, the athletes, the coaches, to really try to increase their strength and conditioning and that’ll build up to, that’ll build up support so that they don 't tear their

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