Jazz Music: Voodoo Rhythms In New Orleans

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Jazz music is the most quintessentially “American” of all music traditions for many reasons. Many people, of different cultures or ethnic groups, have come together to share their love of jazz music. “Jazz has gone from being America’s music to the world’s music.” (www.jazzinamerica.org) “The French, Spanish, and African, Italian, and Irish- found common cause in their love of music.” (www.nps.gov) To some jazz was known as the result of the melting pot, New Orleans. Jazz was created in the 19th century as voodoo rhythms in New Orleans. There, slaves were allowed to own drums. The sounds of European horns and African drums mixed, “it was like lightning meeting thunder.” (www.neworleansonline.com) The locals created the wild music by combining …show more content…
He was the first to write down his music supporting that claim. “There is no doubt that Morton had isolated a music not covered by the blues or ragtime and that he applied a swinging syncopation to a variety of music, including ragtime, opera, and French and Spanish songs and dances.” (www.redhotjazz.com) It was also said he introduced the two- bar break in scat singing, that was also used for improvisation. Jazz music often has a four-four beat to two-four ragtime. “With this device, any music from opera to the blues could be “played hot” as it was described in those days.” (www.redhotjazz.com) One of the most inspirational jazz musicians in American history was Louis Armstrong. He was a singer from New Orleans and an amazing trumpet player. He is said to have had a major role in the creation of modern jazz. (www.listverse.com) The trumpet gained the recognition of a solo instrument mainly because of Louis Armstrong. He also influenced other artists like Frank Sinatra and Bing Crosby. (www.listverse.com) “His influence on music as a whole is immeasurable, both in terms of his singing and trumpet playing which have earned him a variety of honors and awards.” …show more content…
“Miles Davis was at the forefront of multiple musical developments and the emergence of a plentitude of styles.” (www.listverse.com) He launched the development of genres like: be-bop, hard-bop, cool jazz, free jazz, fusion, funk, and techno music. From his success many young artists gained fame. Some artists were: Wayne Shorter, J.J. Johnson, John Coltrane, Herbie Hancock, Bill Evans, Chick Corea, Cannonball Adderley, and Keith Jarrett. In his lifetime he has received a Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction and eight Grammy Awards.

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