Orientalism

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Being from the “ orient” or being from an oriental country can give me the credit of saying that Orientalism has existed for centuries. Studying the orient by some humans of power (Europeans and North Americans) has been one of the most common things that have been done on the orient. Orientalists have studied all aspects of the orient including the orient’s cultural aspect, economical, political, and even simple daily life traditions. This authority that the western have over the “ orient” has a lot of critical aspects to discuss. One major argument is that why do westerns have an authority power over the “orient”? One answer could be because of the European colonization such as Britain and France and recently the United States. But even with …show more content…
Even if there were very few that would do that, it is not as massive as the westerns orientalists. Also, Eastrens orientalists (if one can call them by the term “orientalists”) will never have the authority or the power that the westerns have when exploring the “orient. ” Additionally, for the very few Eastrens “orientalists”, they do not call the western countries as “orient.” Instead, they just call it by its official name (The U.S or France for example). These facts can give the idea that Westerns in general have an authority and power over the “orient.” Europeans originally invented Orientalism, and it represents a huge corporate institution of people that speak and write about the “orient” without any permission given and sometimes not even true facts about the …show more content…
In fact, many orientalists miss understood and miss represented the “ orient” and the people of the orient. Of course, if someone is not from a particular culture, he/she cannot speak for that culture nor study it. Edward Said gives an example about miss representing the cultures by orientalists. He stated “Flau- bert’s encounter with an Egyptian courtesan produced an influential model of the Oriental woman; He spoke for and represented her. He was foreign, comparatively wealthy, male, and these were historical facts that allowed him to possess Kuchuk Hanem physically to speak for her and tell his readers in what way she was “typically Oriental”(Said page.15). This example shows how orientalists are representing the orient and one can sense the stereotyping in these orientalists when dealing with the East. This is also continues till today’s date as the Hollywood movies that relates Middle Eastern countries miss represent the culture and the lifestyle of the middle east. This stereotyping had its roots from centuries

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