Organisational Behaviour: Cognitive & Emotional Intelligence Essay

2495 Words Apr 4th, 2013 10 Pages
STUDENT DETAILS
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ACAP Student ID: 196843
Name: Giuseppina Wolfram
Course: Bachelor of Applied Social Science

ASSESSMENT DETAILS
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Unit/Module: Organisational Behaviour

Educator: Jacqueline Campbell

Assessment Name: Academic Essay: Cognitive & Emotional intelligence

Assessment Number: 1

Term & Year: Term 2, 2012

Word Count: 1,892

DECLARATION

I declare that this assessment is my own work, based on my own personal research/study. I also declare that this assessment, nor parts of it, has not been previously submitted for any other unit/module or course, and that I have not copied in part or whole or otherwise plagiarised the work of another student and/or persons. I have read the ACAP
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A Cognitively Intelligent person’s strengths are improved perception, understanding, and management of one’s emotions (Wood.et.al, 2010). Wood et.al. (2010) refers to a person’s cognitive ability as their verbal comprehension, spatial ability, numerical ability and memory, with cognitively intelligent people generally being more agreeable, open and less likely to engage in risky behaviours, as well as being abile to experience more positive social experiences. Salovey and Mayer (1990) introduced the field of emotional intelligence in 1990 and defined it as the ability to monitor one’s individual feelings and emotions, distinguish between them and to use the information to guide one’s thinking and actions as well as improve their performance. Goleman (1995) claimed Emotional Intelligence was a key predictor of success at home, work and school as well as an essential part in developing a team, leadership as well as management. Emotional intelligence determines one’s ability to learn the practical skills that are based on its five elements: self awareness, motivation, self regulation, empathy, and adeptness in relationships/social skills and these skills can be learnt and transferred into the workplace (Goleman, 1995). Gosling and Gosling (2004) state effective managers not only need technical and interpersonal skills but also benefit from being emotionally intelligent. An emotionally intelligent

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