Organic Food: The History Of Organic Foods

1301 Words 5 Pages
Organic food is defined as, “foods that are grown without synthetic pesticides, growth hormones, antibiotics, modern genetic engineering techniques (including genetically modified crops), chemical fertilizers, or sewer sludge.” (Winter, Davies, 2006). Farmers use crop rotation, tillage, cultivation practices, cover crops, and natural products in order to keep their farms organic. However, organic foods can use a synthetic material, which is defined as a substance that is formulated or manufactured by processes that can chemically change properties extracted from a naturally occurring plant, animal, or mineral source as long as it has been approved by the National List of Allowed and Prohibited Substances (Winter, Davis, 2006). If an organic …show more content…
The history of organic foods dates back to the founder of modern organic farming, J.I. Rodale. Rodale first provided information on non-chemical farming methods that in return influenced organic production methods as well. Even though organic farming has been around much earlier, modern organic farming first started to take off in the 1940’s. Much of today’s organic farming style is integrated from farming styles that are used in India. A scientist by the name of Sir Albert Howard who Rodale modeled a lot of his work after, went to India to observe their techniques and reported back with ideas of having green manure and waist to soil, and prompted the idea of working with nature by using deep rooted crops to draw up nutrients from the soil (SARE, 2012). About thirty years later in the 1970s, an increase in environmental awareness exploded. But unfortunately, the organic farming rules and regulations were far from perfect and complete still. Even though there was a conscience among the philosophical approach, there was no …show more content…
An article published by Northwestern University, “Is Organic Food Really Worth the Extra Cost” by Lisa Watson describes the extensive three-year process foods go through in order to receive an organic certification. In order for meats, poultry, and dairy products to be labeled as organic, the animals are fed organic foods and are allowed to roam outdoors in their natural habitats, never receiving any antibiotics or hormones (Watson, 2008). Farmers can produce crops to be labeled as organic only if chemical pesticides, petroleum-based fertilizers, and sewage-sludge spaced fertilizers are not used in the process (Watson, 2008). Farmers are consistently examined for the organic ingredients in their products and can be fined up to $11,000 for mislabeling or failing to mention all the processes their specific products went through to be labeled as organic (Watson, 2008). While most of the accountability in regards to proper labeling and dealing with organic foods falls on the USDA, farmers also hold responsibility and face many challenges in the production of organic

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