The Medical Misuse Of Organ Donation In African American Culture

Great Essays
Introduction
In recent years, the African American culture has begun to evolve; past medical indiscretions are not weighing as heavily in the organ donation decision-making process. There is an apparent effort of healing and progress that can be ascribed to the open-minded Millennials (Generation Y) and Generation X. The demographic of these adults range in the age range of 18- 50, who accept and celebrate diversity are self-reliant and inventive, Gen X tend to reject the rules, Gen Y rewrite the rules (Scheff, Thiefoldt, 2004). With the progression of the generations and the shifting in the mentality toward society as a whole, this populous is encouraging positive strides for the organ donor arena within the African American culture.
With the changed mindset of these recent generations, they have undeniably stimulated an increase in organ donors; sadly, there is still a huge gap.
To continue penetrating the African American community and combat low organ donation,
…show more content…
Such as, the disclosure of the Tuskegee clinical trial which became the most powerful historical event that formed African Americans distrust in the medical community. In Vanessa Gamble study published in the American Journal of Public Health, she indicated that “The Tuskegee trial has come to symbolize racism in medicine, misconduct in human research, the arrogance of physicians, and government abuse of Black people” (Gamble, 1997). The abuse and misuse is undeniable and can be proven time and time again.
History shows that the medical community created a distrust and unconfident relationship with African Americans. President Bill Clinton, describes the medical abuse in his 1997 apology for the 40 year Tuskegee clinical trial as, it "has reached far and deep, in ways that hurt our progress and divide our

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